Grim Fandango

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JaySevenZero
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Grim Fandango

Post by JaySevenZero » December 24th, 2016, 9:53 am

Here is where you can leave your thoughts regarding Grim Fandango for possible inclusion in the podcast when it's recorded.

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Mechner
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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Mechner » April 24th, 2017, 11:21 pm

Grim Fandango

I played this as a 12 or 13 year old around 2002/2003 on the re-released Lucas arts classic line, I am a Lucas Arts fan boy of the games in the 1990's, as the adventure output was consistently amazing.

Grim Fandango is considered the "killer" of point and click adventures.

Sad, considering nearly every facet of its design is pure gold.

To get it out of the way quick, the gameplay is weak, some people don't like tank controls. I could never understand why, as I have never had any problems navigating this way. Some people don't like dead ends, and getting stuck on "Moon Logic" puzzles, again, I grew up playing these games religiously, so I have a very high tolerance to being stuck on such things, for a long time. I suppose you could also argue, the original game looks a bit jaggy now, but not enough to turn me off it. Though, I can see why all these things grate on people, and make the experience harder to get into.

The remaster however, does take steps into fixing many of these issues.

The art direction in this game is absolutely astounding, it is some of Peter Chan's best conceptual work, and according to interviews, some of his favourite. Faux 1930's art deco, meets Mexican folk lore and Day of the Dead. On paper, this sounds crazy and couldn't possibly work, but, hand drawn, on paper, and brought to life in 3D rendering, it is a marvel to behold.

The whole package is rather insane when you take a step back, but it works so well together, it seems normal, as if these things have always existed together.

Peter McConnell's Soundtrack captures the atmosphere perfectly. Huge and sprawling noir epic strings, meeting Jazz Bebop and Mexican Folk music, with flutes dancing atop. Yet again, McConnell talks about this soundtrack as his magnum opus. He put such love, and affection towards both it, and the remaster, its easy to hear why.

Tim Schafers writing is some of its best, mashing up Noir and Day of the dead seamlessly. The whole 4 year journey of the dead, being sold as a travel package, is a genius idea. The characters are all well rounded and ironically, full of life. Each line of dialogue is being carried expertly, by its voice actors. Especially Manny's voice actor, Tony Plana, whom weirdly enough, is probably most well known from Ugly Betty. He delivers Manny's dry wit, roguish charm and Mexican flavour with ease and confidence, it is hard not to instantly fall in love with Manny.

I would also like to point out one of the most overwhelmingly beautiful parts of the game, this is in "Year 2". Manny makes his way up the light house to meet Lola, only to find her sprouted, uttering her final words as she dies (ironically in the afterlife), her flowers blow to the wind as Manny mourns her passing. There is something so timeless and bittersweet, about the idea, that even in death, you can still fear it. The scene is handled in a truly powerful, yet subtle and layered way. It perfectly sums up the essence of the game in a nutshell.

It's a shame more off the wall ideas like this, don't exist in the triple A space anymore.

If I had one bad thing to say, It is the puzzles aren't all that memorable or interesting, sometimes just plain boring. Particularly one, in which you step into a flower shop, where the clerk behind the counter won't help you, until you ring the bell with your scythe. The game definitely could have used some Ron Gilbert "Puzzle Dependency Chart" polish. Though, it is only a small gripe, to an over all wonderful experience.

I can't recommend "Grim" enough, and with the new remaster available, it plays great, with camera relative movement as opposed to the much maligned "Tank Controls" and it looks great, the low poly models of old are gone, replaced with shiny new ones, they even react to light sources and shadows. The soundtrack has also been mostly re-recorded with live instruments, which gives it a whole new exciting depth.

Finally, that instant change button between remaster and original, never gets old.

Go Play, Now!

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by chdavis0917 » June 29th, 2017, 7:46 am

This is the first time I've been completely let down when playing a game that's been considered a masterpiece. The way that the player interacts with the game world is just so obtuse and archaic, I found myself wandering endlessly just trying to figure out the next thing to click on. Solutions to "puzzles" (I hazard to call them that) include equipping each item and interacting with every available option just to see what sticks. When I finally figured out what to do, I wasn't thinking "boy that was clever." Nearly every one had me saying "wow that was stupid."

I usually don't give much thought to graphical achievement if the gameplay is solid, but honestly the visuals in the remastered version of this game are still just plain bad. Sure the character models are updated, but the environments are muddy and messy, making it unclear what can be interacted with and what cannot. Given the technical achievements of remade games like Kingdom Hearts: Re:Chain of Memories and Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes, I found this effort to reek of laziness.

The game deserves some credit for weaving a decent story, but it's nothing to write home about. I found Manny to be such a weasel I honestly didn't think he deserved to board the Double N train. Manny takes advantage of other characters, lies and steals to finally get to Meche despite only having met her for few minutes. Manny's actions make it clear that he is selfish and conniving, and that his pursuit of Meche is just an excuse to leave his life behind and the people who helped get him there. Much of the relationships that Manny has with other characters is implied more than shown, which leads to many confusing moments where characters die and we were supposed to care (e.g. Lola in Year 2). Overall the story is so disjointed and unearned, I wondered if I had should have spent my time reading a good book rather than slogging through the last two sections of Grim Fandango.

This game made some decent leaps and strides for a 1998 release. Today it is a relic of poor game design and hacky storytelling that is better off left forgotten.

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Whippledip » July 3rd, 2017, 1:23 am

EDIT: I originally wrote this as a response to the post above me but thought I'd try and clean it up so it didn't sound like I was having a very one sided conversation if it got read on the podcast.

Maybe it was the amount of time I had, or it was just the way my brain worked, or maybe just playing nothing but adventure games at the time gave me an extra insight to "the language of adventure games" as I never really had a lot of trouble with the puzzles in this game. I'll give you that some the puzzles in this game are too often subject to the ol' "adventure game logic", but as mentioned, maybe having experience with this kind of thing already made it a bit easier to face, and that people's struggles with the puzzles come from a modern audience who might not be as familiar with old point and click adventure games.

I remember when I first played this being stuck with the ticket printing thing for so long that I eventually just brute-forced through it by methodically going through every possible combination (oh to be 14 years old with unlimited time again) until I got it, and I STILL can't remember how to do it on each subsequent play through that I just use a walkthrough for that part. That said, I think the less adventure game logic of them almost felt too "logical", in that they were too procedural that it was basically just following a series of instructions (the gold flecked vodka and the metal detector, the fire weasels on the bridge for example). But I feel like this is less a game about puzzle solving and more about exploring and driving a narrative so I guess it comes down to a matter of preference about what you want out of the game.

A common criticism of the remastered game is that the graphics haven't aged particularly well and that the upgrades to the character models aren't really much of an step up. First is you've gotta remember that Double Fine is still an independent studio, regardless of Tim Schafer's standing and history in the gaming community, and can't really compete with the financial backing of a company like Konami to invest a bunch of money in to an old game. I also believe that the original backgrounds were either lost, or drawn with a static resolution in mind which would essentially mean the art team would have to redo every single area. I also believe their price point for the remaster was in line with the amount of changes they put in to it. It's worth it just for a remastered version of the soundtrack, which was re-recorded by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. Always got to make that point as it's a bit of hometown pride.

I think it's pretty easy to look past the graphical fidelity of the time in order to admire the production/art/set design of this game. Who knew that the garish colouring, crooked lines and irregular angles of Day of the Dead imagery could mix so well with the completely at odds design ethos of art deco/nouveau in the sharp lines, ornamental accents and restrained colour palette? It's a striking look and is full of little visual treats hidden away in all the locations. It also works as a pretty simple delineation between the "good" and "bad" guys, the art deco buildings and the suits become symbols of greed, opulence, control and power, where the free form lines and bright colours become symbols of the general populace's desire for freedom and life. It's actually pretty cool to see Manny slowly move away from the suit, ironic considering the iconic image of Manny is in his white tuxedo, cigarette in hand. But Casablanca is such a touchstone for this game that it kind of makes sense.

I also think there is a lot to be said about the design of the world and it's structure in relation to class systems, notice how all the wealthiest most opulent places are at the heights of the world and gradually get worse and worse (worse being a relative term) as you move lower? To the point that the worker bees and the communist wanna-bees (ha!) live at water level. It culminates with the similarities between the look and the structure of the DoD at the beginning, to the train station at the end, where one is exclusionary and the other is completely inclusionary, as only in death is everyone truly equal. The train station is even amongst the clouds for some not so subtle symbolism. There is a lot more to say about this but kind of requires more research and time to fully explore, my point is that just doing a surface level reading of how clear the graphics look is not really enough for a game like this.

Manny is a great protagonist in that he's not exactly the best person, he explicitly points out a few times he's been made to do that job to pay off his sins from his living life in order to gain entry to heaven. But following him trying to redeem himself makes for a pretty good motivation to follow his story, even if I wish it got a bit more time compared to the overall crime/noir story. His actions after he met Meche are the result of him trying to atone for his mistakes (which turns out wasn't even his fault) and nobody actually helped him get to his meagre station in purgatory. When he catches up to Meche she actually rebukes him for being so singular in his vision to only help her, and not everyone else who has suffered an extended stay in purgatory because of him.

The people in the world that Manny does manipulate or dick over aren't exactly paragons of humanity either, the key difference being that they're not making any effort to atone or change themselves. There is an argument to be made that the only reason they live in purgatory forever is because they're evil by nature and never prove themselves worthy of ascending to heaven, hence forming their own kingdom of sorts within that world.

Lola's death is a good topic to discuss as I think it's actually a pretty good microcosm of the games themes as a whole, I think that the whole implied relationship he has doesn't quite work for the emotional point that the game tries to hit there, but my reading of the implications of her death was less that Manny is sad and more that a (probably)innocent, or at the very least someone who lived an average life that didn't qualify her for an immediate trip to the #9, doesn't even get to choose the making of her own death, in a world explicitly designed to do so. She's robbed of her agency, and the realisation that the small moments of beauty, the flowers after a sprouting, are wasted in a world that's currently controlled by someone with more power and money that dictates your life (later expanded upon by Hector's greenhouse built on top of a hill completely covered in flowers <insert reference to capitalism here>).

My top 5 games of all time for the longest time consisted of this, and Red Dead Redemption...and that's it. Everyone should play it, seriously. It's so well regarded for a reason, even though these days it's design is a bit dated. But it's just something that wouldn't get made today and I think offers a narrative experience that people should indulge themselves in.

For anyone on the fence, get it. It's on sale often enough that you could get it for 5 bucks these days. My only caveat is to keep a walkthrough handy to get through the boring sections, but aside from that, let yourself get engrossed in the voice acting, the character and world designs, the music, the humour and a story that that echoes the golden age of cinema and pulpy adventure.

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Jobobonobo » August 19th, 2017, 9:25 pm

Grim Fandango was my first point and click adventure game that I have ever tried. My only real PC gaming that I really got into growing up was the Worms series so this genre completely passed me by. After hearing people talk about Lucasarts creating fondly remembered classics that were not Star Wars games and being interested in Schaffer’s work after enjoying Psychonauts, Grim Fandango was always on my “must play someday” list.
The PS4 remake was my chance for me to get my hands on this and I can see why gamers generally speak fondly of it. It has a fantastic art direction, original world building, fun characters, snappy dialogue, cracking soundtrack and an intriguing story. You can absolutely tell that this was a project born out of pure passion and love for storytelling and such work should always be welcome in gaming culture.

In regard to the world itself, mixing Day of the Dead with film noir aesthetics is truly inspired. The Land of the dead is a fun and fascinating locale for the game to take place in and my favourite things to do would be to explore a new area as thorough as I could and talk to the various oddballs that populate this land. The conversations you had with characters were always a lot of fun for me and I would try every option just to see what their reaction would be. Doing poetry at the Blue Casket was a novel bit of interaction that I have never seen before and was always interesting to see if it was possible to make your poem sound in any way coherent. It is these little touches that made the game an enjoyable experience for me.

However, the same unfortunately could not be said of the puzzles. As I said, this is my first foray into this genre and I am not ashamed to say that I had to use a walkthrough for a lot of it. This was because so many of the puzzles, particularly in Rubacabra, seemed to be talk to everyone you see along with all the items you have collected. This often meant that I would just be aimlessly wandering around seeing if I missed anyone or if I missed an item and I just did not find it very compelling.

That kind of gameplay is just tedious. Far more offensive were the puzzles that had no logical basis to them whatsoever. The first offender is when you have to collect the pigeon eggs. To distract the pigeons from their nest you put in a cat balloon into a vent and then you put in bread on top of the balloon. Well pigeons are scared of cats, so they eat the bread and see the cat and fly away, yes? Well no, not exactly. They eat the bread and peck the balloon, causing it to burst which spooks them off. Why did it need to be a cat balloon then?! All balloons make loud noises when you pop them but put any other balloon in and the game says the item does not go there! The fact that it is a cat balloon makes no sense because any other balloon logically should have solved the puzzle. The game is full of these “guess what the developer is thinking” puzzles, by far the worst offender being the forest maze. After hours of fruitlessly trying multiple ways to solve it, I went and looked at a walkthrough. Normally, I hate doing this because the solution is usually quite obvious in hindsight and I feel like an idiot for looking it up. So many of the puzzles here, upon seeing the solution I just went “How could anyone figure that out?!” Clever, well designed puzzles should make you feel silly for looking the answer up. These horrendously designed puzzles leave you no choice and when you realize the solution is so obscure, you just feel angry that your time got wasted.

They were only a few puzzles that I quite liked and that made sense such as distracting the demon beavers and getting Domino’s mouth guard to make a dental imprint to access his files. But those puzzles were honestly in the minority for me. So while there is a lot to enjoy about Grim Fandango and I am glad that I got to experience the story it told, the wretched puzzles ultimately soured a lot of the experience for me. Maybe if I was a younger boy with all the time in the world I might have enjoyed it more but sadly in my adult life I do not think I can have the time and patience to truly appreciate the point and click. A shame.

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Alex79uk » August 20th, 2017, 7:20 am

I've played the beginning hour or so of this game so many times and never got any further than the second act. The puzzles are ridiculous to the point of frustration. I've always wanted to finish it, but it's getting more unlikely to ever happen as the years tick by. All I have to offer is a measly three word review: TOO BLOODY HARD!

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by stvnorman » September 5th, 2017, 8:46 pm

I detest nonsensical puzzle games like this but since its original release I've always been intrigued by the Day of the Dead vibe and what sounded like a cool story. Many years later PS+ provided the opportunity to at least have a look.

I ended up completing the game with a walkthrough at hand to ensure no interruption of enjoyment the second a ridiculous puzzle presented itself to my logical brain! The story was as imaginative and engaging as I'd always anticipated. The remastered graphics mode didn't do that much for me, and occasionally hampered progress as everything seemed a bit darker and harder to make out, but it was fun switching between the old and new.

And any purists disgusted by my blatant disregard of the game's key mechanic will be pleased to hear that karma had its way with me when I only realised there was a run button in the very final sequence of the game!

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by kintaris » September 5th, 2017, 9:54 pm

stvnorman wrote:
September 5th, 2017, 8:46 pm
I detest nonsensical puzzle games like this but since its original release I've always been intrigued by the Day of the Dead vibe and what sounded like a cool story. Many years later PS+ provided the opportunity to at least have a look.

I ended up completing the game with a walkthrough at hand to ensure no interruption of enjoyment the second a ridiculous puzzle presented itself to my logical brain! The story was as imaginative and engaging as I'd always anticipated. The remastered graphics mode didn't do that much for me, and occasionally hampered progress as everything seemed a bit darker and harder to make out, but it was fun switching between the old and new.

And any purists disgusted by my blatant disregard of the game's key mechanic will be pleased to hear that karma had its way with me when I only realised there was a run button in the very final sequence of the game!
Having grown up on a diet of adventure games, using walkthroughs (or at least an entire physical book of extremely strong hints) has always been a viable part of the LucasArts point and click experience right out of the box - it's only the technology that's changed. You're playing it right, sir!

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Whippledip » September 5th, 2017, 11:49 pm

Also, Tim Schafer released his design documents for this game a while ago. I'd recommend having a look through.

http://gameshelf.jmac.org/2008/11/13/Gr ... _small.pdf

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by nickturner13 » September 29th, 2017, 10:37 am

Alex79uk wrote:
August 20th, 2017, 7:20 am
I've played the beginning hour or so of this game so many times and never got any further than the second act. The puzzles are ridiculous to the point of frustration. I've always wanted to finish it, but it's getting more unlikely to ever happen as the years tick by. All I have to offer is a measly three word review: TOO BLOODY HARD!
I pretty much echo these sentiments. I loved point and click adventure games growing up, and spent a lot of time with games such as Police Quest, Space Quest, Quest for Glory, The Dig, Indiana Jones & Last Crusade, Full Throttle... but never did play Grim Fandango, it came out at a time that I didn't have a PC capable of playing it, and being 19 at the time, was an age where computer games took the back burner to going out and having fun. When I was at home, my brother's PS1 kept me entertained.

I finally came to pick this up on Steam earlier this year with the remaster. Sadly I just couldn't get into it at all. As I never played it in the 90's, I don't have the cloud of nostalgia reminding me how I felt at the time, I only have my current impression of the game, and that is that it's infuriatingly difficult and I just really couldn't get immersed in the world.

I think also that perhaps it's just a bit too wacky for me, I prefer my games to be more grounded in reality.

Don't think I'll ever get round to playing it again, let alone completing it.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (12.10.17): Grim Fandango

Post by Hunter30 » October 10th, 2017, 7:08 pm

I’m slightly breaking my own rule here in posting, as I haven’t yet finished my first playthrough of Grim Fandango, but wanted to offer a few thoughts nonetheless. It’s one of those older games whose reputation I’ve been aware of for some time, especially as a result of its frequent appearances on all-time lists, but not got round to playing until now. That reputation I mention was not just for being a classic entry in the point-and-click adventure genre, but also for being bloody tough, with some obscure puzzles. My wife and I were looking for a new name we could play together, and, figuring two brains working together must stand a better chance than my paltry one, we decided to take on Grim Fandango. As the remastered version had been released relatively recently, that’s the one we went for, and as with almost all my PC games, I picked it up through a Steam sale.

We’re currently towards the end of Year Three, so I guess about three-quarters of the way through the game. Before we started, we vowed never, under any circumstances, to resort to looking up solutions online. Despite a couple of hairy moments in Year One, including my wife literally falling asleep next to me while I scratched my head and tried to work out how to get into that chamber where the message tubes go, we managed to stick to our promise. Then came Year Two and Rubacava. I don’t think I’ve ever spent as long wandering aimlessly round a location, trying every conceivable thing in a desperate bid to get out. And this is coming from someone who has been to Swindon. It got to the point where every utterance of “not picking that up” or “I don’t want to mess up my blade” elicited fresh groans of despair. Although we progressed in fits and starts, we eventually, inevitably, reached a point when the well of inspiration had run dry. We debated long and hard, but the temptation had become too great. Filled with self-loathing, we turned to Google. That happened twice in Year Two, once where we kicked ourselves, and the other time where there was no way we’d ever have arrived at the solution ourselves (the betting slip puzzle).

We’ve also looked up a third solution so far, in Year Three. Unfortunately, much like any addictive behaviour, once you’ve started down that road it becomes very difficult to turn back. I can accept a certain difficulty in these sorts of games, and indeed, without that challenge you don’t get the same sense of satisfaction on the occasions when you do crack a puzzle by yourself. I do think though that Grim Fandango gets the balance slightly wrong, especially when compared with a game like Broken Sword. A hints system to provide a middle ground for those after a bit of a nudge in the right direction would be one way of addressing this.

Difficulty aside, we’re having a great time with the game. It’s a weird but wonderful story, and Manny Calavera is up there as one of the most charismatic protagonists in video games. A skinnier and pastier George Stobbart. It’s also made us realise that this genre is great for playing together, and we’re now building a list of other similar games that we want to tackle next.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (12.10.17): Grim Fandango

Post by Todinho » October 10th, 2017, 8:35 pm

Grim Fandango is one of those games that had been evangelized to me for years, many times hearing that it was the best point and click game of all time, since I was never a fan of the point and click genre that didnt mean a whole lot to me, but after hearing so much about the story for so long I eventually went to youtube and watched an entire longplay of the game, I enjoyed what I saw and was content to call it there, until a few years later the remastered version was announced and for some reason I got into my head to play the game by myself, so when that came out I bought it on steam straight away and started playing it, I was enjoying myself until I got stuck at the very first area of the game and promptly quit.

My big problem with Grim Fandango, and most adventure games, is the the pixel hunting you have to do just to find the pieces of puzzles that then require some incredible convoluted logic to solve, It's extremelly frustrating to not be able to solve a puzzle not because you cant figure it out but because you just didnt scan a certain corner of the screen and is missing a vital piece to do it.
I quit the game but eventually I picked it back up when it came out on PS plus and Im not ashamed to say that got myself a walkthrough to consult whenever I got stuck, with the walkthrough in hand I was able to finnish the game and I have to say I enjoyed it quite abit, Im not sure how to properlly explain this but just being able to walk around the enviromments by myself, talk to the characters at my own pace and even solving many puzzles(the ones I had to resort to the walkthrough not withstanding) made the whole experience alot more enjoyable then simply watching it.

What surprised me the most actually playing the game was how much more into the story I was, maybe it was because I had already seen the humor but by taking my time and by kinda of unraveling things on my own I got really invested in the characters as the game went on, especially when it comes to the main duo of Manny and Glotis I even found myself getting emotional at the ending something I didnt get by watching it and certainlly didnt expect, the game takes place during a 4 year journey and by the end of the game it really does feel you went through a journey with them, the side characters are also all pretty great being really funny and quirky but also having a certain depth to them and arcs of their own.
Also as an aside this is one of the very few games that I ever played that not only has a portuguese dub but that I found the portuguese dub superior to the english version so that was pretty neat.

In the end Grim fandango is a complicated game to recommend , on one hand the characters&world are fantastic but on the other you have to get through some old tropes of moon logic and pixel hunting to be able to enjoy alot of it, it's not like all of the gameplay is like that there's actually some cool puzzles I enjoyed solving, but for every puzzle I liked there was another that made me bang my head against a wall only to look at the walkthrough and find out that I missed an item in a corner or that required a level of mental gymnastics I would never have guessed.
Still despite everthing I enjoyed playing Grim Fandango alot more then just watching it so I guess I would say that people should experience the game but maybe keep a guide close by.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (15.10.17): Grim Fandango

Post by BlueWeaselBreath » October 15th, 2017, 3:39 pm

I played Grim Fandango years after its release, as I tend to do with most games, and was really knocked out by the way its amazing music and unique visual aesthetic combined to create a movie-like experience. The combination of Dia De Los Muertos Mexican culture and film noir was not one that struck me as a particularly obvious one, so it earns my admiration for creativity, and it works so well here. The jazz tracks in particular are amazing. I love the expressiveness of the muted horns, which typified that era of jazz that the soundtrack is evoking. I emailed Peter McConnell about ten years ago asking if he had sheet music available for purchase so I could play the GF tunes with my college big band or small jazz combo, and he wrote back thanking me for the inquiry, and telling me this was the work he was most proud of, but unfortunately he didn't have the rights to the music. I was thrilled when the remaster featured an updated soundtrack with more real instruments and higher fidelity sound (I believe the original was padded out with some synthetic sounds in places where it would be less obvious). Grim Fandango is easily my favorite game soundtrack of all time and -- even though I found it challenging in many sections as the previous commenters noted -- playing it initially is one of my favorite adventure game memories simply because of how the whole experience came together in a cinematic way, like an animated film. If you're not a fan of somewhat obtuse adventure games but love innovative animated movies with great music, watch a playthrough of the remastered game (one with no player commentary ideally) and I bet you would still get a lot out of the Grim Fandano experience.

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Re: Grim Fandango

Post by Donk » October 17th, 2017, 2:41 pm

I missed this game back in the day, looking at the time period I was exclusively competitive FPS at the time so it's not surprising. I'm partial to the Double Fine games so I made point of playing this not long ago. I made my way to Rubacava on my own feeling pretty good with myself, picked up some items there made a little of progress and boom. I hit a wall, dead stuck, spent a few hours there banging my head against the wall and rage quit. Rubacava is huge!

I eventually swallowed my pride and looked up the solutions and f me, I'm sorry but there's no way anybody ever finished this game on their own. Even with the solutions it took a while sometimes to figure things out but I'm glad I looked it up, I love the world building and characters but I would never have been able to finish it. To be fair I was playing it on my Android phone in shorter sessions and less context each time coming back to the game. No complaints with the mobile port, haven't had any issues.

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