The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

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ThirdMan
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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by ThirdMan » March 19th, 2018, 10:55 pm

deacon05oc wrote:
March 19th, 2018, 4:57 pm
I’m new to Breath of the Wild. I’ve been playing for about 2 weeks now. Ive pretty much just have been traveling to towers and shrines. Any tips on what major thing to try to tackle? Also should I check out the expansion pass now? Or wait til I finish?
Defeat the four Divine Beasts. Each time you defeat one you're granted a special skill and those four skills will make exploration and combat a lot more enjoyable.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Simonsloth » April 15th, 2018, 5:40 am

Silly question and may have already been covered.

I don’t own a switch but bought a Wii u last year. Aside from the obvious portability of the switch is there any reason to make the leap for this game is the Wii u version perfectly serviceable.

I’m aware of the merits of the switch but my vita still has plenty of life left in it for portable games playing

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by ratsoalbion » April 15th, 2018, 6:22 am

The WU version is almost equally wonderful, just lower res (720p) and apparently lacking a few subtle environmental sound effects.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by ThirdMan » April 15th, 2018, 6:44 am

Simonsloth wrote:
April 15th, 2018, 5:40 am
Silly question and may have already been covered.

I don’t own a switch but bought a Wii u last year. Aside from the obvious portability of the switch is there any reason to make the leap for this game is the Wii u version perfectly serviceable.

I’m aware of the merits of the switch but my vita still has plenty of life left in it for portable games playing
I bought a Switch to play Breath of the Wild. It was my first NIntendo console. I put about 15 - 20 hours into it and loved every second, but eventually I sold the Switch (long story). In February I bought a Wii U to both play Breath of the Wild and have access to other Nintendo games. So I have experience playing BotW on both systems.

I've put over 70 hours into the Wii U version and I can assure you, it's way more than just serviceable. It's an outstanding game on the Wii U. Don't forget that BotW was meant to be a Wii U game all along, before eventually being positioned as a Switch title. So it feels like a game that was polished up to perform on a Switch, rather than one that was dragged down to squeeze onto the older machine.

It's definitely not one of those sub-par, cross-generation releases that we're used to seeing when a new generation of consoles are released. BotW on Wii U is a fabulous game.

There's some technical comparisons available online if you want to dig a bit deeper but, in summary, the Switch outputs at a higher resolution and the Switch's handheld mode offers the most stable framerate. The Wii U version does drop a lot of frames at times, especially in busy areas or when there's explosions on screen, but the Switch, when docked, had a similar problem, albeit not as noticeable. It's not a technical powerhouse on either machine.

It's all about the ideas, the systems and the gameplay and all of those factors absolutely sing on the Wii U.

I do have one complaint, however. It's not exclusive to the Wii U but does feel worse on that system. Motion control! There are a number of shrine puzzles that use the motion control on both systems. They are, hands down, the worst aspect of the entire game (for me, at least). They completely break up the flow of the gameplay. On the Switch I found them annoying, but not insurmountable. On the Wii U I found them excruciating and have skipped every single one. That's perhaps a very individual complaint but it would have been remiss of me not to mention it.

Anyway, that's my two cents. If you're itching to play BotW then go ahead and buy it.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Flabyo » April 15th, 2018, 3:59 pm

I played it on the WiiU and it’s absolutely fine on there.

As others have said, this was built as a WiiU game and only ported up to Switch very late on.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Simonsloth » April 15th, 2018, 7:41 pm

Thanks for the info everyone.

I remember buying twilight princess with my Wii and then regretting it because of all the waggling that the GameCube didn’t have.

Think I’ll go with the Wii U version

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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by JaySevenZero » January 13th, 2019, 12:58 pm

Here's where you can contribute your memories and opinions of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for potential inclusion in the forthcoming podcast.

Friendly reminder to all that where feedback for the podcast is concerned, we love it - but self-editing (brevity) is appreciated. We do want to include a breadth of opinions where appropriate, but no-one wants a discussion podcast that’s mainly reading. Better to save yourself time and cut to the chase if you can.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by bixer » January 14th, 2019, 3:38 pm

I know this probably seems like treason given the internet's general consensus, but I don't understand what all the fuss is about with Breath of the Wild.

For the first hour or two I thought I was going to love it just as much as everyone else did. The game looks stunning and controls just as well as you'd expect it to. Being able to look anywhere into the distance and realise that you can get there is something I've never experienced in a video game before and was a truly incredible new experience. I was also initially a fan of the shrines, as the standard Zelda dungeon formula was becoming stale, so multiple shrines with only one or two puzzles within them as opposed to fewer dungeons with multiple puzzles within them felt like a good way of freshening up the franchise.

One of the first common annoyances however is the weapon degradation system. The 'reward' of finding a new weapon is instantly diminished when you realise that it's basically only going to last you for 10-20 hits before it vanishes into thin air. You soon get to the stage where running past enemies seems a better choice than engaging in combat so that you don't have to deal with this as much.

While the first shrine I entered seemed like an interesting new idea, by the time you reach the second and third, you realise all the textures within all 120 or so of them are just copied and pasted and working your way through them soon becomes a chore for that reason - paired with the fact one of the 'rewards' for doing so is just another papier-mâché weapon that you're too afraid to ever actually use. I soon found myself wishing we could just go back to the tired dungeon formula.

The fact that you can go anywhere you can see also starts to wear thin once you realise that there's not actually very much to do in between destinations. Enemies are a hindrance that are to be avoided for the reasons above and other than that it sometimes just feels big for the sake of big. Yes, the terrain and the scenery look stunning, but if the only added gameplay from that is that I have to hold forward on my left joystick for an extra couple of minutes every time I want to go somewhere, I don't really understand how that's a pro.

That level of expanse could be fine, but a big open world adventure like that lives and dies by whether or not traversal of the world is fundamentally fun. Again, here unfortunately it's not, due to the frustratingly low stamina gauge you start the game with. It's a solid 3 or 4 levels lower than it should be and getting it powered up enough until it's actually at a usable state takes far, far too long. You'll constantly fail to climb anything that takes more than 10 seconds to do so and don't even get me started on the pointless extra tedium added to that when it rains.

It's a good game, no doubt about it. It's ambitious and I respect Nintendo for not just playing it safe and giving us the usual linear adventure, as that's just starting to feel like variations on Ocarina of Time at this point. But for all the problems with the game mentioned above, I just don't understand how the game seems to have already reached this 'masterpiece' status among critics and gamers alike.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by stvnorman » January 14th, 2019, 9:23 pm

When I got a Switch and a copy of Breath of the Wild for my birthday in 2018, the first thing I did was play Ocarina of Time on my 3DS. I’d never played a Zelda game before and wanted to play a classic before being spoilt by the latest and greatest.

I started Breath of the Wild the same night I finished Ocarina a couple of months later, and for the next 90 hours revelled in a glorious looking, enormous version of a world I’d recently become very familiar with, and surprisingly attached to. I felt genuine sadness visiting places like the Temple of Time, and seeing its decayed state in such stunning detail. But more often than not, just wow, look how far we’ve come!

I found that the main story mixed very organically with side quests, shrines and other things to discover, at least until very late on when it was clear you could choose whether to bring it to a close or carry on doing what you fancy for as long as you wanted to. I made that decision after 80 hours, with the last two Divine Beasts ready and waiting to be tamed, and what could be deemed a slightly anti-climatic climax after that.

As a footnote, I’ve since played through the original Legend of Zelda on the NES Classic and again on the Switch. Breath of the Wild is a very good game, and might be the latest, but for me at least, the greatest lies much further back in its ancestry!

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by DomsBeard » January 15th, 2019, 11:30 am

Ocarina of time is one of my all time favourite games so I had high hopes when I bought this when I picked up a Switch but I have tried and failed on 4 occasions to play this game.

It boils down to it making itself too difficult to get into. The weapons degrading system is a farce and freezing to death if you go the wrong way in the games opinion early doors got tedious very quickly. I enjoyed all the shrines I took on but I have filed this under it's not you it's me as a Zelda game I will never get on with.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by KissMammal » January 15th, 2019, 4:11 pm

While I don't consider BotW to be the best Zelda of all time (I'm not even sure I'd consider it my favourite Zelda of the last decade) and I generally sympathise with all the usual complaints and frustrations leveled at it, I think it's easy to forget how stale the series was becoming prior to 2016, and I cannot overstate how relieved I am that Nintendo decided to take such a bold leap into the unknown and attempt to shake the formula up with this iteration.

I didn't complete the game - I lost interest shortly after unlocking the last section of the map (figuring that I'd seen most of what the game had to offer) but very much enjoyed the 50 or so hours I spent with it, and I'd love to see where Nintendo takes the series next - perhaps a quasi-sequel in the same mold as what Majora's Mask was to Ocarina of Time?

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Nupraptor » January 18th, 2019, 6:42 pm

Breath of the Wild is an utterly glorious game and one of my favourite games of all time.

The main wonder of the game comes from the combination of the core mechanics and the game world itself. You very quickly realise that you have two defining abilities from very early on. First, the ability to climb on virtually any surface in the game. This means that the possibility for exploring the environment is unlimited. There are very few games that offer that level of freedom. The second is the acquisition of the glider that further speeds up your ability to explore and incentivises vertical exploration.

Then you have the game world itself. It's so rich, beautiful and teaming with new things to see and do. There are Koroks hiding under rocks or behind mini environmental puzzles. These give you a quick burst of satisfaction for solving them. There are monster encampments to discover and strategize how best to approach and defeat. There are shrines to discover and puzzles to overcome which each challenge you in new ways and encourage you to explore the depths and flexibility of the game's mechanics and physics.
There are so many things scattered throughout the environment to make exploring an endless joy, whether it be puzzles, combat or simply another amazing view or new environment to see.

This game means even more to me because it was one of the first games that I could truly share with my daughters. They were 8 and 10 at the time. We each had a save file and we would swap stories about the different things we had seen and discovered. We would offer each other tips and encouragement. Despite all my gaming experience, the controls and mechanics were so intuitive and user friendly, that they could jump right in and they discovered many of the game's environments and secrets before I did.
I was delighted when they tracked down and learned how to tame horses before I had. I remember the time we first saw a dragon, elegantly and slowly cruising through the sky of the game world, not as a specific, scripted event, but just there, in the world. We shared the delight when one of us found each new Champion Memory and were treated to a new and beautifully animated cutscene as a reward. Our crowning achievement was when we finally found the final memory.

If my daughters had any complaints about the game then it would be that they would LOVE to have been able to play through the game as Zelda herself rather than just as Link. This is something that emphasised to me the importance of representation in video games and media in general. We all have the capacity a empathise with characters even from different backgrounds to ourselves, but there is a different dimension when a character shares specific features and commonalities with you. I'm a straight white male and so I never have a shortage of main characters in games or media who share many of my features. This is not the same even for the roughly 50% of the population who have two X chromosomes. Things have really improved in terms of female representation in video games, but even today, you see a more limited range of female protagonists in games than you do for male protagonists. My daughters thought Link was great, but they would have been able to identify even more with a female protagonist who had her own agency. We are told that Zelda has been using her power to hold back Ganon's evil for many years, but it's not often that we get to see her ability and agency directly. Even in the final confrontation, she bestows her power to Link for him to deliver the final blow against Ganon rather than doing it herself.
This point is our only real "criticism" though and even then it is more an aspiration for the future rather than an actual criticism of the game itself.

I believe that Breath of the Wild is gaming at it's finest. It is a joy to play. It is freedom. It is wonder.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Nupraptor » January 18th, 2019, 6:55 pm

Apologies to Leon by the way. I understand if all that is too long to include in a podcast. I'm sure there will be a lot of people who have a lot of things to say about this game - including criticisms. There is some sort of satisfaction just in having written my thoughts down, even if it doesn't make the cut. Looking forward to reading more responses.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by ElsieTheAdventurer » January 19th, 2019, 7:52 pm

Breath of the Wild is applauded for moving the Zelda series away from linear game design and back to the open world exploration of earlier titles. I actually see the Hyrule in BotW as a hybrid of both, marrying open world and linear game design. I think a good example of this is the Sah Dahaj shrine. Once you find the foothill stable near Death Mountain, you notice a path leaving the stable, worn into the landscape, which isn't marked on your map. If you follow the path it takes you through some caves, and then to the shore of a lake. At first disappointed that the path leads nowhere, you notice it actually descends into the lake and, upon examining your map, you realise there is a path of shallow water you can follow across the lake, which leads to a hidden shrine.

The Hyrule in BotW is a tapestry of small puzzles like this, leading away from main paths and key landmarks, and rewarding you with shrines, korok seeds and treasure. I think this is a fundamentally different approach to open world design, which usually scatters destinations and events across an otherwise inert landscape. The result is that your exploration in BotW is driven by curiosity and not by following markers on a map. Breath of the Wild is a masterclass in discovery and, with its use of landmarks, landscape design, settlements, curiosities and vistas makes exploration fun and rewarding.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by davelawrence8 » January 28th, 2019, 12:58 pm

The Legend of Zelda needed a breath(!) of fresh air. Yes, the series is beloved and usually successful for Nintendo. And yes, there were experiments with A Link Between Worlds and Spirit Tracks. But the item-dungeon-beat the boss rinse/repeat cycle, along with the hand holding, were getting tired. Other games were taking the Zelda formula and doing interesting things with it. Zelda was due for an evolution, if not a revolution.

Along comes Breath of the Wild, with its open-environment concept and its rethinking of the Zelda formula. I’m so happy it helped to kick-start Nintendo’s Year of Success in 2017. It was my reason for buying a Switch.

The thing is, some fans are still unhappy. “It doesn’t have true dungeons!” Or, “Where are all the cool items?”

In reality, BoTW fits my mental model for how a Zelda game should truly be. Zelda is more than dungeons, more than items, more than the Triforce or even the Master Sword. Zelda is, first and foremost, about adventure and discovery. It’s about getting lost, or trapped, and finding your way back again. From the first Zelda, through A Link to the Past (my favorite game of all time), and a few of the modern titles, these games are about exploration. Even Miyamoto said as much. It’s this sense of discovery and exploration that Breath of the Wild brings back, and with the modern trappings of an open world philosophy, it makes for a beautiful and fun game.

Do you want dungeons? How about a labyrinth, or a Shrine, or a Divine Beast. Do you want unique items? How about a tablet, with those items installed for you. Oh, and there’s the Master Sword, hiding out in the Lost Forest. It’s Zelda, all right, just rethought.

And let’s talk about the music. While most of the series has presented these grand, fantasy epics and memorable soundtracks, Breath of the Wild does something different: it stays mostly silent, except when something interesting happens. To me, this makes it a poignant soundtrack. You have the piano interludes when you stumble across something in the environment, and you have the classic Zelda theme drift in while horseback riding at night. Then there’s each village’s theme: the callback of Rito Village, and the additive nature of Tarrey Town.

For me, the soundtrack is at its best in Hateno Village. I find excuses to make my way back to Link’s house just to hear the xylophone (or marimbas? I can’t tell) start up and the achingly beautiful string part. It’s lovely.

Breath of the Wild does have its annoyances. I wish there were more enemy types, like tektites or darknuts. And that final battle was grand, if a little easy. But after beating the game, I’m excited to start it again, and perhaps discover something new with all the DLC additions.

It was easy to love the Zelda series before Breath of the Wild. But if I’m honest with myself, I know that this particular game has reignited something that I haven’t felt in video games in a long time: a sense of adventure and discovery. It’s given me a sense of freedom, roaming the countryside looking for fights with bokoblin camps, or going hunting in the woods for a deer (to eat or ride!). It’s given me an adventure that is uniquely my own. My quest is different from my wife’s, is different from anyone else who plays the game, etc. Pick which outfit is your favorite, pick which Divine Beast is first on your to-do list, pick the name of your horse, pick which items you like to collect – heck, even pick whether you’re going to be a chef or a warrior or a ranger. It’s all up to you! I love that flexibility.

The game has also given me an appreciation for good beginnings. Besides that stormy opening night in A Link to the Past, walking out of that cave and seeing all of Hyrule spread out in front of you in BoTW made for the most magical, memorable start I’ve experienced in a video game.

I wish I could play Breath of the Wild as I did on that first day: knowing very little and excited to go exploring.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by DaveParky84 » February 2nd, 2019, 5:46 am

I struggle to find words that adequately describe my experience with Breath of the Wild. Simply put its one of the most magical and wonderous pieces of art ever created.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Jordonya » February 3rd, 2019, 11:08 pm

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is my favorite game of all time, my favorite Zelda game, and to me redefines what makes open world games great.

Starting off this game is what i want other game developers to look to for open world games. Traversal in this game is great seeing it allows you to climb vitually every wall and travel any bit of water you run into. Also if you manipulate the magnesis ability theres a way to fly outside of puting octoballons on the four points of rafts plus the hang glider which i wish was in every game ever now. With all these possibilites for traversal in the game it is never a matter of “If” i can get there its more of “How” can i get there. Even with the restriction that is the stamina bar the game allows you to go and complete and explore more of this beautiful world to upgrade your health or stamina to use for any means nessisary.

Speaking of game worlds this game in my opinion is the peak for open world gamesso far. Due to the traversal options avaliable they made a game world with vast valleys to explore and tall mountains to climb. Not only that the hang glider allows you to quickly explore large swafts of land that most games would just force you to walk and trudge through. If your also in a large flat plain once you recieve Revali’s Gale it allows you to get a giant gust of wind to help you get high up a mountain very quickly or use it just to glide across the land. If you cant you can ride a horse to help or even in the dlc a motercycle!

Now the puzzles and dungeons / shrines are not the best in the series i loved being able to explore this world and just find a small puzzle here and there that would give me a korok seed or even another shrine. I loved that since it made the world seem endless with so much to do that even when i open this game up from time to time it seems theres always one more thing to find even after my game time clocking over 250 hours.

The big thing about this game though is it amazed me that i was able to play this ON A PORTABLE DEVICE. I spend countless hours that went by quickly when i would play this in the car during long trips while i was not driving or even during my breaks at work. I still to this day think it is amazinf that a game of this size fits on a small little screen that i can take anywhere i go. Not only that the game is gorgeous. The art design they used for Breath of the Wild is something im glad they took some inspiration with from with Wind Waker. I find the game has a ton of charm and even funny seeing every female seems to comment on how good looking Link is.

I find also having no companion to be a huge breath of fresh air seeing how this game does not hold your hand at all and presents a lot of mastery of the systems that is not unfair at all but encourage you to learn your way around certain obstacles and enemies similar to a Souls style game.

I can gush for a long time about this game. This to me is the benchmark for open world games. The story might not be the best. The characters might not even have the best writing but they have a certain amount of charm and give me my favorite incarnations of Link and Zelda that we have seen to date. I even love the weapons having durability system since it excourages you to not stick to one weapon and to try out new things. As much as i love the old style Zelda games i want there now to be a mix of both the older style and this new open world style. And i want more game developers to look at Breath of the Wild as inspiration when making a open world game seeing this game did so much to redefine that genre with how truly open it is and even in terms of quest structure as well. I love this game. It is my new number 1 now and it looks to stay there for a long time. This game encouraged me to play the older Zelda games i missed and i absolutly do not regret it.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by seansthomas » February 4th, 2019, 6:54 pm

I'm sure there'll be huge correspondence on this game so I'll cut to a couple of thoughts that may work in isolation.

Firstly:

I adore the use of sound in Breath of the Wild. The environment creates your personalised soundtrack. When the effects as you ride a horse merge with a hint of a Zelda theme barely audible on the wind, it's magical. It gave me the feeling that I was playing through someone's vague, fragmented recollection of the entire Zelda series.

Yet I'll always remember the assault on Hyrule Castle the most vividly. The way that classic theme starts as you set foot within the castles perimeter will always stay with me. And it's such a clever trick. Hold back a conventional, cinematic score for 200 hours until the point where you forget they ever existed and then they hit you with it at the bitter end. It was the icing on an already bloody tasty cake and the perfect finale.


Secondly:

As you age, many things about life improve; food, technology, music... I genuinely believe all of these things get better as humans do. But there's something about those initial formulative experiences that is hard to rekindle or replicate as you get older. And as impressive as a lot of modern games are aesthetically and gameplay wise, I never truly expected a game to be able to compare to the first time I moved Mario around a 3D world or crash landed on Tallon IV.

Breath of the Wild reawakened that naive, wide eyed love for gaming in a way that no other title has in two decades.

When games call themselves open world experiences I tend to wince, as often they're linear scripted narratives spread out over a wider playing area. Sure, you can go to that mountain but there's no point. Or you can advance the story but you have to trigger certain events first.

Breath of the Wild was different; it truly offered me freedom. The hand holding of the Wii era was purged and I had the chance to make my own way through Hyrule at my own pace. Distances seemed vast. Enemies unbeatable. I spent hours just listening to the wind, taking photos of sun rises or climbing a mountain to see a dragon fly past up close. I adored the calm of the game and how organic it all felt. I couldn't see the telltale signs of gaming development showing through the cracks, just a living, breathing world.

A group of about 5 of us at work sat swapping stories every lunch time, remarking on where the previous evenings meanderings had taken us. We recalled tales of islands where you lose all your weapons, a vast graveyard full of malfunctioning Guardians, a charming remote fishing village and shrines hidden atop a snow covered mountain an hour trek from anywhere. Some of those things I found a week later. Some a year.

Equally Twitter became a wondrous place for a few weeks, as it started filling up with people achieving incredible things with the games physics systems and helping each other out without any spoilers. I even had friends from school reconnecting to merely ask 'are you playing this'?

A sequel could likely improve some of the pacing, the dungeons, the menus and the weapon breaking system but what it'll struggle to do is surprise and delight me in the way Breath of the Wild did. It represents Nintendo returning to the peak of their powers, ripping up the rule book and making gaming wonderous again.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by Ciaran86 » February 4th, 2019, 8:14 pm

I have two thoughts to add to this:
  • I found out that the Switch consistently holds roughly three hours battery life, as practically every time I played BotW, I kept going until the battery ran out.
  • Switch-hand is really a thing. That feeling of pins and needles on little, ring and middle fingers on both hands is uncomfortable.

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Re: 360: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Post by seansthomas » February 5th, 2019, 8:27 am

One last minor point:

I played this on Wii U, and I feel torn about whether or not that was the right call. The proliferation of small enemy camps and abundance of shrines seemed designed for short bursts of play on Switch in your downtime as opposed to a long playthrough on your sofa.

Equally the Shiekah Slate device you use throughout the game is obviously the Gamepad and early E3 previews showed Aonouma using it to navigate the inventory and map. Seeing that blank screen do nothing throughout the entire final game, and knowing of the potential it had, was the one telltale sign of the games cross platform transition and left me with a slight twinge of what might have been.

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