All things The Legend of Zelda

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Jusifer
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Re: Our next Zelda podcast recording (15.10.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess

Post by Jusifer »

the legend of Zelda series was one of my most followed ones in my nintendo golden era (n64, gc and wii) and what lit up that fire more and more was the super smash bros series as you could control link like never before. after getting the toon version of the legend of Zelda my teen self was really waiting for a more darker more realistic version again. i really loved majoras mask and it's still my favourite zelda game and it had some real dark moments and themes. so as you can imagine i was really excited for twilight princess. To keep a long story short I really liked it. it's a really solid zelda game as far as I can remember. the thing is though, I have never returned to it. I played it once caneing and rinsing it 100% and never went back. so all i can say is that for my teen self the teen wolf zelda is one of the best zelda games.

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gallo_pinto
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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by gallo_pinto »

Craig wrote:The biggest difference story wise is Linebeck now has a bit more of a fleshed out back story. And when I say back story I specially mean the first Pirates of the Carribean movie.
I'm almost done with my playthrough of Phantom Hourglass (one temple left) and I'll post my full thoughts when I finish. But it was funny to to see you say this. I could have sworn that I read at the time of release that Linebeck was based on Jack Sparrow from Pirates of the Caribbean. I just did a Google search to try and find confirmation and couldn't find anything, so maybe that was just a rumor. But one of the manga images you posted looks STRAIGHT out of that movie.

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Re: Our next Zelda podcast recording (19.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by gallo_pinto »

I bought Phantom Hourglass at launch and beat it over the course of the next month. I don’t have strong memories of that playthrough, but I remember being mildly disappointed.

I just finished it for a second time to play along with the podcast and my opinions have crystalized a bit better. I’ve replayed a lot of Zelda games for the podcast this year and playing them all so close to each other showed me just how different and unique Phantom Hourglass is.

The most obvious example is the stylus-only gameplay. It changes everything from combat to item management, but that control method also allows for some very different gaming experiences. The focus on cartography and map-based riddles makes some of the puzzles more visual-spatial in nature than previous games. Phantom Hourglass uses other DS hardware features that wouldn’t have been possible in older titles. Some, like closing the lid to transfer the map seal, were pretty neat. Others, like yelling into the microphone to lower an item’s price, were kind of lame. I really did appreciate the new types of unique experiences that Phantom Hourglass provided though.

That being said, I think this is one of my least favorite Zelda titles because of what it had to give up in order to fit these new experiences in. I recognize that a lot of what I enjoyed about Phantom Hourglass required stylus-only controls. But I think the stylus-only controls ruined the combat in the game. It was never that difficult, but I was also never fully engaged. When I took a hit, I got frustrated because I didn’t feel I had full control over my character.

Before I get to my final point, I want to point out that Phantom Hourglass is a really funny game. There’s a moment where Oshu asks Link for the titular Phantom Hourglass to finish making the final sword. Link starts the “thrust-new-item-over-head-in-triumph” animation only for Oshu to nonchalantly grab the hourglass out of his hands. Linebeck also has a well delivered “It’s dangerous to go alone” joke.

And there’s a moment that serves as a microcosm about my overall feelings towards Phantom Hourglass. At the very end of the game,
Spoiler: show
after you think you’ve beaten the final boss and rescued Tetra, giant tentacles come out of nowhere and snatch her up once again as Link’s mouth hangs open in disbelief and Linebeck yells “WHAT JUST HAPPENED??”
On one hand, it was a funny scene that made me laugh in a way most Zelda games don’t. On the other hand, in order to make that joke work, they took the the most fun, charming incarnation of Zelda, made her even more of a damsel in distress than she ever was in Wind Waker and then kidnapped her again, all in service of a punchline. The joke just wasn’t worth it what it had to give up.

Phantom Hourglass does some cool stuff that is wholly original and expands the concept of what a Zelda game can be. Unfortunately, the game just wasn’t worth what it had to give up.

Three Word Review: Physics Defying Boomerang

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Re: Our next Zelda podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by GoodShrewsbury »

There's a spectrum of Zelda aficionados from those who love a single title to those who are complete zealots. I guess I'm somewhere in the middle? The game that has most viscerally, memorably impacted me was Ocarina of Time. To this day, it is the game I consider the greatest of all time. With that said, no other Zelda game has come anywhere near the level of interesting characters, awe-inspiring level design, and story pacing that Ocarina presented to me. Having played Majora's Mask, Minish Cap, A Link to the Past, Twilight Princess, and Windwaker as the only other Zelda games, it appears to me that I may not be the Zelda fan I believed myself to be.

With that said, I recently completed Windwaker HD and loved it. Wanting to play, or replay, many of the "better" Zelda games I dove right into Phantom Hourglass, as it seemed the most likely successor. In March 2015 I had planned to play through at least a half dozen Zeldas in quick succession, but this one stopped me flat, and the momentum crashed to a halt. Starting this title there was the typical Zelda whimsy that grips everyone who enjoys this franchise. The dungeons were pretty cool for a handheld entry. On the back of Windwaker it had a very familiar aesthetic that I really enjoyed. The new control style was a tad clumsy, but I knew that, given time, Zelda would win me over, as is the usual with any new entry and its associated quirks. However, the controls were so very, putridly awkward. After probably 5 to 6 hours with this game I never developed a comfortable way to utilize the gimmick pushed by the dual screens of the DS. It broke this game completely for me, and I've tried twice to come back to it but it only gets worse the more I try. I truly am envious of those who embraced the control scheme and enjoyed this title, as I'm sure there was a lot to love. I found myself begging for legacy controls, a la Minish Cap etc., because constantly moving the stylus over the same screen I was watching Link on was terrible. If somehow the player could have moved Link on the bottom screen (I know it's not touch sensitive) that would have been wonderful, so I could have seen what the hell was going on.

Sadly, the controls did it for me. I haven't been back to Zelda since.

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Re: Our next Zelda podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by gallo_pinto »

GoodShrewsbury wrote:Sadly, the controls did it for me. I haven't been back to Zelda since.
I don't blame you at all for bouncing off of this title. If I can make a humble suggestion though, you should skip this one, skip Spirit Tracks and go straight to Link Between Worlds. I don't know anyone who dislikes that game and it uses a much more traditional control scheme.

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Re: Our next Zelda podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by Stanshall »

Phantom Hourglass was the game that made me buy a DS. I remember seeing the TV advert with the spin attack carried out by a little circle on the touch screen and then drawing the flight path of the boomerang, extinguishing torches like a dot to dot. I was absolutely thrilled by the imagination and invention and the gameplay possibilities of the technology. I talked about it to my non-gaming mate in the pub that night, got him excited and the next day we both bought a glossy black DS. It's still probably my favourite ever console, a perfect marriage of form and function, and the greatest fingerprint collector of all time.

That said, while I gamely persisted with Phantom Hourglass, and it did have its moments of utter delight and invention, having to use the stylus for basic movement gradually sapped my enthusiasm and engagement with the game. In particular, the roll mechanic was utterly unpredictable and inconsistent and therefore infuriating when it was needed. Now, that may partly be down to the screen protector which was misaligned by about half a millimetre on one edge of the screen (as I say, I was pretty excited when I tore the box open) but the point remains that the control method was wilfully unconventional. As many have said, a combination of D-pad and stylus was both what I'd expected and what I think would elevate the fundamental gameplay today and make for a much more tempting replay.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by Truk_Kurt »

Phantom hourglass was the first Zelda game I finished having only played twilight princess which I wasn't keen on. I understand that it is not viewed as one of the best zeldas but because it was the first I completed I think that's why I hold it in such high regard. I enjoyed the puzzles and the innovative use of the DS features like blowing into the microphone and closing the DS. These were mind blowing for me at the time.
There were some frustrating elements like having to replay the dungeon near the end and the combat wasn't particularly deep but overall I enjoyed the game and it lead to me making sure I bought wind waker HD when I got a WiiU.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by AndrewBrown »

I can anticipate the two primary complaints that will be leveled at Phantom Hourglass: The touch controls, and the Temple of the Ocean King. I do not contest these complaints. The touch controls are imprecise, particularly when I am required to slash with the sword or roll into an object, and my hand tends to fall asleep while holding the stylus. The locking nub digs into my finger, leaving a sore. A spirit found deep in the Temple exclaiming how much better touch controls are than buttons and a D-pad is obnoxious salt in the wound. I am sympathetic to these complaints; I think it was only many, many hours tempering my patience and my fingers with Metroid Prime: Hunters that let me weather Phantom Hourglass with few complaints.

As to the Temple of the Ocean King, I think it is correctly maligned, but often misunderstood. I don’t want to cast aspersions on any specific people who may complain about the Temple, especially on this very podcast, but it is a common complaint about Zelda that it has become “formulaic,” that it has become predictable, uncreative, and rote. So I appreciate that the Temple of the Ocean King tries something new. It is not a dungeon which is attempted once, but is attempted multiple times (at least five total, if not more for greater mastery), with new paths discovered through old areas thanks to new tools. I feel that, had its “challenge mode” time trial aspect been made more apparent from the outset, my frustration at repeating floors multiple times would be lessened, like learning how to power slide perfectly around every corner of every track in Mario Kart.

But there are other things I can admire unabashedly. Few other games in the DS library make better use of its technology; I’m not sure why the ability to take notes on a map did not become standard on the handheld, and the “press the map” puzzle has since become the stuff of legend. The bosses are all very good, reaching admirably to use both screens in creative ways; I don’t feel they always succeed in accomplishing what could not be done with a single screen, but bless the developers for trying.

But then there’s Linebeck, who may be my favorite supporting character in the Zelda series. He injects some much-needed humor into the series; keeping an eye on Linebeck in the background of a scene usually leads to a good laugh.

I think it’s important to remember that the Link in this game is the same from The Wind Waker; he has already completed his hero’s journey, so putting him through another one would be either boring, or redundant, or both. So it falls to Linebeck to be the traditional “hero” of Phantom Hourglass, who goes through his own Campbellian Monomyth. He begins cowardly, out for his own profit, but meets a mentor (Oshus) and goes on a trip with a companion who contrasts his own strengths and weaknesses (Link). It’s a subtle transformation over the course of the plot, but his concern that Link complete the quest transforms from greed to heartfelt investment at its success. When confronted between a choice between his own life and helping his friends, he chooses his friends, even though he is clearly out of his element and almost immediately suffers a great personal loss for it. But he makes the right decision, as his friends bail him out, and he chooses as his reward not great personal wealth, but merely another chance to go on another adventure like the one that made him a better person.

Though I recognize its flaws and weaknesses, I find myself liking Phantom Hourglass thanks to the ideas it tries to capitalize on, as well as a strong character like Linebeck. I put The Wind Waker to task for having a big world with very little in it; it was not dense. Phantom Hourglass is the other extreme. Its world is small, but there is always something new around the next corner. What draws me to Zelda is its spirit of exploration and discovery, and Phantom Hourglass does a wonderful job of exuding those virtues.

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Re: Our next podcast recording (20.11.16) - The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by gallo_pinto »

AndrewBrown wrote:But then there’s Linebeck, who may be my favorite supporting character in the Zelda series. He injects some much-needed humor into the series; keeping an eye on Linebeck in the background of a scene usually leads to a good laugh.

I think it’s important to remember that the Link in this game is the same from The Wind Waker; he has already completed his hero’s journey, so putting him through another one would be either boring, or redundant, or both. So it falls to Linebeck to be the traditional “hero” of Phantom Hourglass, who goes through his own Campbellian Monomyth. He begins cowardly, out for his own profit, but meets a mentor (Oshus) and goes on a trip with a companion who contrasts his own strengths and weaknesses (Link). It’s a subtle transformation over the course of the plot, but his concern that Link complete the quest transforms from greed to heartfelt investment at its success. When confronted between a choice between his own life and helping his friends, he chooses his friends, even though he is clearly out of his element and almost immediately suffers a great personal loss for it. But he makes the right decision, as his friends bail him out, and he chooses as his reward not great personal wealth, but merely another chance to go on another adventure like the one that made him a better person.
Interesting take on Linebeck. I have to admit, I didn't have the same reaction to him. I could see what they were going for with him and I think your read on the Campbellian myth is spot-on. It just didn't work in execution for me. He was too unlikeable for too long for me to have much emotional attachment to his hero's turn at the end. They used the same basic character arc for the Goron kid who helps you in the Goron temple in that he starts off obnoxious but becomes a key ally. But because he was only obnoxious for about 30 minutes, I ended up liking him. They made Linebeck cowardly and slightly antagonistic to Link for almost the whole game, so even though I knew it was to set up a moment of self-sacrifice, I never bought in emotionally. I bet that mostly comes down to whether his jokes and humor work for you though, which is totally subjective. For me, an example in the Zelda universe that pulled this off better was Tat'l in Majora's Mask.

Also, did you end up 100%ing this game? It was on my eighteenth failure on the bow and arrow shooting gallery, right before wanting to chuck my 3DS at the wall, that I had the thought, "I really hope Andrew Brown doesn't feel the need to go for 100% on this one." :) I played it pretty thoroughly and I think I ended up with about 15% of the overall ship parts.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

Post by AndrewBrown »

I make my case about Linebeck much more eloquently here: https://playcritically.wordpress.com/20 ... -linebeck/

I've been missing just one of the Golden Ship Parts on the DS version for a few years now. That's all I need to 100% it.

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The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

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Here is where you can leave your thoughts regarding the The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for possible inclusion in the podcast when it's recorded.

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The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword

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Here is where you can leave your thoughts regarding the The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword for possible inclusion in the podcast when it's recorded.

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The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks

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Here is where you can leave your thoughts regarding the The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Track for possible inclusion in the podcast when it's recorded.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks

Post by gallo_pinto »

We’re approaching the end of the Cane and Rinse Zelda series and I’ve finally found it: Spirit Tracks, my least favorite Zelda game. I didn’t necessarily love Phantom Hourglass either, but I appreciated that it was able to do new, different things with the Zelda formula because of its two screens and stylus-only controls. I think Spirit Tracks jettisons a lot of what made Phantom Hourglass special and fails to replace it with anything engaging.

My first hour with the game was pretty positive. I think the presentation is much better this time around. The music in particular is really strong and evokes the feelings of speeding through the countryside on a train. Zelda is charming and it’s fun to have her as a companion character.

My last hour with the game was ALSO really positive. I thought the final boss fight was one of the best in the series. Controlling Zelda as a Phantom as she stoically marched towards Malladus, shielding Link from the laser was pretty cool. Distracting the giant boar as Link so that Zelda could hit it with a Light Arrow was great. Both stages of the fight reinforced the idea that Zelda and Link needed to work together to bring down Malladus and made the story ending more powerful as a result.

My feelings towards the 23 hours in between the first and last hour are less kind though. I don’t hate Spirit Tracks, but my biggest emotional response to the game was boredom. (Except for when I had to use the DS microphone to use the spirit flute or the leaf whirlwind. That emotion was definitely hate. Did the director of the game have stock options in a microphone company? Who thought that was a good idea??)

Generally speaking though, while I didn’t hate it, I found Spirit Tracks to be a boring game that was too long by at least ten hours. Riding around on the train was significantly less engaging for me than Phantom Hourglass’s boat. After mapping out the route, there would be fairly long stretches of time of just waiting to arrive at the destination. I stopped exploring and doing side quests because I didn’t want to have to drive from the fire realm back to the forest realm. And a lot of the side quests were literally “Pick up person at Point A, drive them to Point B.”

My last point is that I felt Phantom Hourglass justified its use of stylus-only controls by basing the game on map puzzles and visual-spatial riddles. Spirit Tracks uses the exact same control method, but plays more like a traditional Zelda game. The only mechanic where the stylus felt essential was telling Zelda where to go. As a result, the controls frustrated me here more than they had in Phantom Hourglass.

While I adore the Zelda franchise, there are other Zelda games that I have had problems with (Zelda II, Skyward Sword and Phantom Hourglass all come to mind). But they felt like bold experiments or slightly unpolished gems. In my personal opinion, Spirit Tracks is the only Zelda game that fails to justify its existence. It’s not terrible, but it’s my least favorite of the series.

Three Word Review: Breezy, Benign, Boring

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Craig
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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks

Post by Craig »

Phantom Hourglass is a wonderful game that toys with all the DS's abilities in interesting and thoughtful ways that really plays into the system's strengths. Spirit Tracks is... not.

First, the good.

The dungeons are well designed and in the first half of each you use the item you gained in the previous dungeon, which gives a longer life to your gadgets.

Zelda's character works well for the most part, and it's great that she's an active participant in trying to get her body back rather than looking on in peril. The central dungeon is a lot more varied this time round and working in tandem with Zelda is usually pretty fun.

But there are so many things that bring the game down that it's tough to recommend.

Firstly, the microphone controls. Now the two major times you'll be using this is with an item you find in a dungeon and playing the flute. The latter requires you to also hold the stylus on the screen at the same time to hit different notes. If you're having trouble getting it to work reliably, don't sit too close to the microphone, make sure your hand isn't in the way and try to use short blast of air rather than a constant blow. It'll mostly work.

But therein lies the problem. If I have to explain how to do something that should be as simple as "blow into the mic" and can only really give the guarantee that it will work *most* of the time, well it's not really intuitive any more. It doesn't work as it should.

It also prevents this game from really being truly portable because you're never quite sure whether you'll be able to have a quiet area when a microphone section turns up. The portable game in which you pretend you're on a train is unsuitable to be played on an actual train.

There are two side quests that persist throughout game. The stamp book is great; it rewards hunting out nooks and crannies and inventive item use. Each one you find also gives you a cool stamp and even if you don't claim the reward it's nice just to see what it'll look like. Stamp rallies are really common in Japan, especially around train stations so it's nice to see that in the game.

The rabbit hunting quest, however, is just dreadful. Because of the limited exploration abilities of the train the rabbits aren't really *hidden*. Sure, they're behind rocks, but if you pass an area you'll probably be breaking the rocks anyway so it's just a test of "have you been down this particular section of rail yet?"

The final boss is a slog which requires you to hit the energy back and if you mess up just once, you have to do it from the start again so you have to get it right 10 or so times in a row. It's not hard to mess up either because the control wasn't meant for that kind of timed precision. And if you die on that section and you have to do the previous forms again.

But by far the biggest problem of Spirit Tracks is the train. At best, it's boring. At worst, you have to literally sit still doing nothing to prevent a one hit kill sending you back to the start of the map.

There is no exploration to be found here. There's no "oh, I'll just go this way, maybe there's something interesting?" If there's somewhere you can go, there's a track there.

Even when you do have somewhere to go there are vast stretches where there is just nothing to do. I sat watching my train for two minutes with the only thing to do was to kill one easily dispatched enemy. Imagine you had to climb *that* ladder between *every* fight in Metal Gear Solid 3, and you didn't even have the haunting acapella accompaniment.

I hated travelling by train so much that I just stopped doing any side quests. There were warps here and there, but they still felt cumbersome to get to and didn't particularly help that much.

It still wouldn't have been the best, but had the train upgrades also upgraded your speed, the train experience would have improved ten fold.

But perhaps I'm being too harsh. Perhaps Nintendo have created the perfect train simulator. Unfortunately for us, rather than the nippy and effectively Japanese system, they've aped the British railways. It's slow and boring with little to do, regularly delayed and detoured with the omnipresent looming threat of cancellation, and whenever there's another passenger, they're always moaning. All they're missing is overpriced, disappointing sandwiches.

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Re: Our next-but-one podcast recording (14.1.17) - The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks

Post by Octorok385 »

... WHY TRAINS??

Love the podcast, keep up the good work. Cheers!

...BUT WHY TRAINS?

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword

Post by seansthomas »

I've had two very different experiences with Skyward Sword.

My first playthrough left me somewhat underwhelmed; the game mechanics felt antiquated and returning to the same few areas grew tiresome. The final few hours of the quest were unnecessary padding but overall, I really missed a sense of scale within the game; Skyloft hinted at a huge kingdom underneath but I felt robbed of a huge vista or mountain scene opening up in front of Link.

I then decided to replay it on Hero mode several years later which, until you pick up a Heart medal makes it a stiff challenge and more methodical quest. And second time around, I fell in love with it. 

I still had a few annoyances that seemed more a case of Nintendo not noticing what others were up to than game breaking faults, but things such as items recurringly telling you what they are every time you collect them, your inability to skydive unless its in certain precise places, Fi signposting your adventure far too much, rupees largely being redundant and a lack of side quests outside of Skyloft all felt antiquated given what was releasing on other formats at the time. But outside of those irritations I found a lot to love.

Returning to the three main environments didn't frustrate me like it did first time around as they changed and presented new experiences, though the final 1/4 of the game still outstays its welcome and makes you go on some pointless fetch quests to add unnecessary padding. I did more of the side quests this time around and found the characters connected to them really charming too.

There were things I appreciated about it greatly on both runs. The story is fairly decent, with a few superb moments that played with the passing of time, such as planting the seed and finding it grow centuries later and the realisation of who the old lady in the Temple is. Groose and Gihrahim are quirky and unusual characters for the series. The end act is brutally emotional. I was sad to see certain companions depart and that sense of loss is now amplifed further by Iwata's name appearing at the very end.

The score is truly amazing; the series rarely let's us down in this respect but this one has real range, from epic to whimsical. For example, Groose's theme does an incredible job of fleshing out his comedic character traits via its almost flattulent horns and sluggish pace. And the art style found a balance between Wind Waker's simpler styling and the more realistic leanings of Twilight Princess, with the painterly out of focus effect being particularly gorgeous.

I liked the motion controls by and large, even if they did need the odd reset. The only thing that slightly cheapened them was finding out you could just flail your arms about in many instances and they'd be more effective than carefully placed but slightly misregistered single hits. The equipment you pick up is fun too, with much of it being used throughout the game rather than in just one location.

Skyward Sword perfects the 3D Zelda series started by Ocarina of Time in a wealth of ways and gave the Wii the swansong it merited. But there were also many signs here that Link needed to move on...

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

Post by Octorok385 »

Link Between Worlds is the only modern Zelda game I would recommend to a non-gamer who wanted to know what Zelda is all about. It captures the exploration, puzzles, and feeling of acomplishment that established the Zelda series at the start, and it lacks the annoyances of the 3D games. There is no complicated lock-on combat that tears you away from the exploration, and no "look around the room until you can see a switch" situations.

LbW maintains a perfect pacing throughout, with each dungeon and area of the over world jam packed with secrets. There is no 'down time,' no arduous chore sections, and, mercifully, no dredging an ENTIRE OCEAN. Even the game's largest sidequest, an Easter-egg hunt for 100 squeaky octopuses, doesn't feel like a major chore.

I can say with certainty that A Link Between Worlds builds on the world created by Link to the Past and brings it successfully into the modern age.

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Re: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

Post by Suits »

I was taken aback about how much I enjoyed this game.

It was one of the most recent games I've had the 'can't put it down' syndrome with.

It was last summer, that I really got into it, after getting it for Christmas from my in-laws a few years back when it first came out.

Having being built on the Z:LttP world there's not much you can go wrong really, in terms of size, secrets and the feeling of varied adventure.

The new 4th dimension stuff was good and gave a new perspective to puzzles and a good satisfaction through the fingers. The new fast travel system was welcome, perhaps because of being so familiar with the map in the first place and the way that the map was broken down into chunks, or regions, with its secrets numbered was also a welcome addition.

Rupee's actually meaning something, or being useful was great also. Having to rent/buy the dungeon items was a good little twist to the meta of the game which mixed up the preparation to a dungeon well. Because of this exploration of the map and it's nooks felt rewarding, finding a red and purple rupee's was now a pleasure and gave everything more a of meaningful satisfaction.

I remember feeling like the difficulty hit me quite hard at the start of the game, then just after the third dungeon and I'd acquired a few extra heart pieces it melted away to nothing and very rarely felt challenging from a combat perspective. The challenge came from the puzzles in the dungeons which was great.

The dungeons, wow, I loved these dungeons, some of the best I've had the pleasure of working trough. The Ice dungeon being one that stood out to me as an absolute blinder.

All in all, this is one of my favorite Zelda's, although it's personally hard to separate it from the Z:LttP. Perhaps a little too hard to give it a true, fair personal reflection as a stand alone title as LttP is one of my all time favorite games.

Very good game, highly recommended.

Also, worth pointing out I feel, that it's almost perfect for the 3DS. The pick up put down of it and the dungeon length suit the 3DS wonderfully. I played mine on a N3DS and I think it's one of, if not the best, game I've played that used the 3D functionality.


3 Word Review - Perfect Portable Zelda.

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gallo_pinto
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Re: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

Post by gallo_pinto »

Suits wrote:3 Word Review - Perfect Portable Zelda.
Damn, I'm gonna need a new 3 word review now! :lol:

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