JoyCon Drift

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Beck
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JoyCon Drift

Post by Beck »

My left con has started suffering from JoyCon drift, if I press right on the analogue stick it will continue to input up until I press down. Has anyone had this problem and how did you fix it?

I know Nintendo said they were going to repair for free but I've also read that they've stopped that. My switch is 2 years old and I'm trying to weigh up if it is worth sending it back, buying a new one or even trying to fix it myself. Any advise would be appreciated :)

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Suits
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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Beck wrote: April 23rd, 2020, 8:50 am I know Nintendo said they were going to repair for free but I've also read that they've stopped that. My switch is 2 years old and I'm trying to weigh up if it is worth sending it back, buying a new one or even trying to fix it myself. Any advise would be appreciated :)
My friend managed to get two sets of Joy-Cons repaired, well outside of warranty for free. This must have been close to six months ago now and I've also 'heard' that others haven't been as lucky.

But my mate was.

Beck wrote: April 23rd, 2020, 8:50 am My left con has started suffering from JoyCon drift, if I press right on the analogue stick it will continue to input up until I press down. Has anyone had this problem and how did you fix it?

So, its a fairly simple fix if you have the tools.

Nintendo pretty my for the majority of their outer casings use Tri-Wing screws, or the Y series of heads.

Nintendo say that they use a Y0 head, although I use a Y00 as it seems to give a better bite on shallow screws.

After that, once you're past the casing, you'll be using cross heads screws.

Replacement analogue sticks for the Switch are £6.48 and I use their parts all the time, not this product specifically but many many others and I'd get one from them no problem.

https://www.zedlabz.com/collections/swi ... ck-zedlabz

You don't have to dissemble the entire JC to get to the stick unit, but I'd do so as otherwise it'll be fiddly and it's much easier to do so.

Here's an open JC.

Image

The stick is under the right hand side of the mother board.

The ribbons are tricky at first but after a while you'll get confidant with them and their delicate but not Pringles delicate so its cool, just make sure you use a plastic tipped tweezer so to reduce the chance of splitting the ribbon.

Swapping out the stick is as simple as undoing two screws.

Good luck man, it's fairly simple.


Or, if you don't fancy this, I'd be happy to do it for you.

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Beck
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Re: JoyCon Drift

Post by Beck »

Thank you so much suits, that really helps! I owe you a pint, or a turnip or whatever is the current lockdown currency :)

I'm going to try and fit it myself. I've been watching a ton of videos on YouTube lately on fixing consoles and have fancied maybe repairing an old PS4 I have so this seems like an easy one to start with. This is the guy - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfOrKQ ... f_fFVb8pYw

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Not a Joy-Con, but Joy-Con-related: I unpackaged a brand spanking new Switch Pro Controller last night, only to experience stick drift in the Left Analogue Stick.

Went into calibration, and found that the stick sat very slightly in a down-left position at rest. Handily, the stick calibration shows where the stick should sit at rest with a '+' symbol, and I could immediately see that it was off.

For a few moments I mulled over the odds of getting a replacement with the same issue, and how to even go about returning it at the mo'. I then tried blowing compressed air into the gap between the stick base and the controller case whilst holding the stick as far as possible in each cardinal direction. I figured this wouldn't work, as how could build up of plastic dust have occurred in a fresh, unused controller, but I guess testing/transport had resulted in some, because air displacement worked!

Long story short: Nintendo have some issues with their analogue sticks. But you already knew that!

Am I being unfair in thinking that controller issues across the board have been much more prevalent this gen? Between DS4 batteries and thumbstick grips, Xbox Elite grips and Switch analogue sticks, it feels like everyone's got problems.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Beck wrote: April 24th, 2020, 10:25 am I'm going to try and fit it myself.
Awesome mate, you'll really enjoy it.

I tend to watch My Mate Vince, and Elliot Col. They're both British, so things like power, tool measurements and part accessibility are things I can relate to better.

HazeRedMist on here did exactly the same JC repair that you'll be attempting and he successfully carried it out without any experience also.

Just set aside plenty of time, so you can take you're time, with as little distractions as possible.

There are tool kits for pretty cheap that will include everything you need to do the job.

Double check you have everything you need too, as there's nothing more annoying when you get the bottom of something to suddenly be stopped in your tracks if you don't have a Torx bit or something.

Get some little pots to store the screws in, take plenty of photos for reference also as you take it apart it will help if you forget which board goes back first with what screws etc.... also, not essential bit really helps me is a white light lamp that you can shine on your work, it really helps with not having to strain your eyes.

I'm well jealous :lol: .

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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James wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:03 am Am I being unfair in thinking that controller issues across the board have been much more prevalent this gen? Between DS4 batteries and thumbstick grips, Xbox Elite grips and Switch analogue sticks, it feels like everyone's got problems.
You're not wrong.

I wonder if this current generation of consoles have seen the most use out of any previous generation also.

I tend to have about three or four controllers for my consoles and perhaps the rotation of those mean that I don't suffer the same fate as many, many others with these defects.

Apart from my PS4 battery life :lol: .

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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James wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:03 am Am I being unfair in thinking that controller issues across the board have been much more prevalent this gen? Between DS4 batteries and thumbstick grips, Xbox Elite grips and Switch analogue sticks, it feels like everyone's got problems.
Yes and no.

Battery problems have certainly gotten worse considering all the fancy juice-sucking tech that is being crammed into modern controllers.

As for stick drift and peeling rubber, this was always a major issue on the 360 controller as well, and even the PS2 & PS3 weren't completely without problems. My pet theory is simple: Analogue sticks become more sophisticated and therefore more fragile when you insert a button inside of them. I've never had any issue with my GameCube or Wii analogue sticks and I believe it is due the lack of any push-in button destabilizing the base.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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I looked to have fixed it, at least for the short term. I tried compressed air before with no luck but I've just used it again with a very fine brush and that looks to have cleared the debris causing the drift.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Beck wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:13 am I looked to have fixed it, at least for the short term. I tried compressed air before with no luck but I've just used it again with a very fine brush and that looks to have cleared the debris causing the drift.
Hooray and downer at the same time !!!

**as you don't have to get your screwdrivers out now :lol: .

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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KSubzero1000 wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:11 am As for stick drift and peeling rubber, this was always a major issue on the 360 controller as well, and even the PS2 & PS3 weren't completely without problems. My pet theory is simple: Analogue sticks become more sophisticated and therefore more fragile when you insert a button inside of them. I've never had any issue with my GameCube or Wii analogue sticks and I believe it is due the lack of any push-in button destabilizing the base.
Really ?! I've never heard or come across either myself or know of anyone that has had faulty 360 sticks.

That's not say it doesn't exist, just not something I've never come across.

Honestly, I think your theory is just coincidence, but of course I don't know, I'm just going off my own experience so it cannot be ruled out.

The overall design of the analogue housings really hasn't changed much since the Original DualShock, you'd think that by now Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft would have designed out such a major design flaw like that.

I think, just my theory, that it comes down to usage, cleanliness and physical impacts that cause the drift.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Suits wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:40 am Really ?! I've never heard or come across either myself or know of anyone that has had faulty 360 sticks.
Back in my Halo days, I had to buy a new controller at least once a year because the drift had become really noticeable by then. This was 100% a problem. I also had one 360 stick become really stiff and difficult to move over time.

Suits wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:40 am Honestly, I think your theory is just coincidence, but of course I don't know, I'm just going off my own experience so it cannot be ruled out.

The overall design of the analogue housings really hasn't changed much since the Original DualShock, you'd think that by now Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft would have designed out such a major design flaw like that.

I think, just my theory, that it comes down to usage, cleanliness and physical impacts that cause the drift.
Think of it this way: In order for the stick to be pressed down and the LS / L3 function to activate, there needs to be a cavity of some sort. Not only does that take away from the structural integrity (thinner parts more prone to wearing out over time), it also gives more room for the dust to lodge itself in.

Ever heard of any GameCube or Wii Nunchuk stick drift? There's no doubt in my mind, those are significantly more stable.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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KSubzero1000 wrote: April 24th, 2020, 12:03 pm Back in my Halo days, I had to buy a new controller at least once a year because the drift had become really noticeable by then. This was 100% a problem. I also had one 360 stick become really stiff and difficult to move over time.
For you it seems like it was mate. Sorry to hear about that.

I was a Halo hound too, in fact a full on 360 player that generation and it's never been something I've noticed on my own controllers or hear about.

KSubzero1000 wrote: April 24th, 2020, 12:03 pm Think of it this way: In order for the stick to be pressed down and the LS / L3 function to activate, there needs to be a cavity of some sort. Not only does that take away from the structural integrity (thinner parts more prone to wearing out over time), it also gives more room for the dust to lodge itself in.
Yes, I'm reasonably familiar with the switches and how they work, although I was surprised to see that the actual button pad is on the side of the unit and MoBo, not underneath as I had originally thought it would work.


Image


I'm still learning about the actual part, how it works, where the weakness are and how they have changed over the decades of use.

KSubzero1000 wrote: April 24th, 2020, 12:03 pm Ever heard of any GameCube or Wii Nunchuk stick drift?
No. I'd also not ever heard of 360 sticks dropping like flies until you mentioned it an hour ago.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Well I spoke too soon... Screwdrivers and new thumbstick have been ordered :)
James wrote: April 24th, 2020, 11:03 am I unpackaged a brand spanking new Switch Pro Controller last night, only to experience stick drift in the Left Analogue Stick.
That's shit bud. I have a pro controller and really like it but I've found the d-pad to be a little inaccurate. It made Celeste much harder than it needed to be. It seems to be a common problem with a relatively easy fix but not brave enough to try that one - http://www.ateijelo.com/blog/2017/07/12 ... pad-issues

As for the PS4 controllers / battery issue. I heard on a podcast that replacing the battery with a bigger one is relatively straight forward. I've not really suffered the problem to be honest because by the time the battery is dead the controller is well used with the analogue sticks and shoulder buttons feeling worn out. I've had 3 PS4 controllers and could have easily put in 1,000 hours so I can't complain.

Each controller has its own flaws. PS4, Battery and the analogue stick rubber going. Xbox, they feel a little cheap in areas and the vibration isn't as good as the PS4. Switch Pro has been really great apart from the d-pad sensitivity.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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Beck wrote: April 24th, 2020, 1:33 pm I have a pro controller and really like it but I've found the d-pad to be a little inaccurate. It made Celeste much harder than it needed to be. It seems to be a common problem with a relatively easy fix but not brave enough to try that one - http://www.ateijelo.com/blog/2017/07/12 ... pad-issues
Yes, this is a pain in the bum.

Puyo Puyo Tetris made this fault massively clear on my launch Pro Controller.

You'd press left to move the piece and the controller would register down, thus, hard dropping the pice where ever it was above.

Reports are that the later controllers, especially the themed ones like Splatoon, Xenoblade and Smash, don't seem to have the same issue. I have all those limited edition controllers and haven't noticed the fault on those.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

Post by James »

Also the first time I've heard of the 360 controller having stick drift issues. Seems to happen quite often that a consumer electronics issue passes some folks by, whilst others are plagued with problems.

I have d-pad input issues like that with the DualShock 4 too. It's particularly weird there, as the d-pad looks like it ought be 4 discrete buttons, but the '+' being a single piece of plastic under the shell causes the same issue, I guess.

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Re: JoyCon Drift

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James wrote: April 24th, 2020, 3:18 pm I have d-pad input issues like that with the DualShock 4 too. It's particularly weird there, as the d-pad looks like it ought be 4 discrete buttons, but the '+' being a single piece of plastic under the shell causes the same issue, I guess.
It could be, yeah.

Worth knowing though that under the single piece d-pad there is a rubber mould that holds, four separate black little contact pads, which when pressed down firmly makes contact with the Mother Board and bridges a trace connection and thus registers an input.

Faults like this are common in pads and more often than not, a damn good clean will sort those type of issues out 8-) .

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