Games Completed 2024

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Jobobonobo
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Jobobonobo »

I knew that Tetris Attack was a reskin of another game but did not know that the Japanese original is on the Switch Service! Nice when us in the west get the original Japanese version of anything.
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oni-link
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by oni-link »

Quake II 64

I played the remaster of the base game last year and loved it, so went back for the N64 version this year

It's much shorter than the original PC game. I beat it in about 2.5 hours. It's quite an odd experience as it does somewhat follow the plot beats of the main game, but often a lot smaller in scale. So many levels and ideas feel familiar but not as you quite remember them.

The rest of the game is a mix of new levels and remixed ideas from the main game

Ultimately, it's more Quake 2, and that's only a good thing. The trophy for beating the Quake II 64 campaign refers to the game as being an alternative reality take on the main game, and that fits pretty well I think
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duskvstweak
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by duskvstweak »

Finally completed FTL: Faster Than Light after (x) years. Recently corrected some bad habits and learned of some things I was just ignoring, saw the end credits. Albeit, on normal with the original ship.
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Indiana747
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Indiana747 »

(Jan) Battlefield 3 - Series X.
(Jan) Hi-Fi Rush - Series X.
(Jan) Daymare 1998 - Series X.
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markfm007
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by markfm007 »

Spoiler: show
January 6th - Persona 5 Royal
January 11th - Control: Ultimate Edition
January 23rd - Alan Wake 2

I’ve been absolutely hooked on this. It looks and sounds amazing, and is constantly keeping you guessing with twists and new ideas. There’s a constant sense of suspense and mystery, and can be genuinely scary, particularly early on when you know less. But it retains the personality and endearing humour of Alan Wake and Control. Shooting is still just ok, but I appreciated the perspective shift and focus on storytelling and suspense over waves of enemies.

There’s a lot to unravel, which is fun to ponder on, but also a bit too convoluted for me by the end. Not everything connected or paid off as well as I’d hoped. But a lot of it did, and the promise of a new game plus that reveals further mysteries does appeal to me, if not immediately. I’m also glad I played Alan Wake and Control, as I’d have been lost otherwise. It was easily my favourite of the three, and made up for its imperfections with just how impressive and inventive it is overall.
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Scrustle
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Scrustle »

Spoiler: show
12/01 - The Legend of Zelda: The Missing Link
28/01 - Tony Hawk's Underground

As someone who doesn't have much experience with this series, and never played this one in particular before, I found this stood up as a pretty decent game still. I think I might have missed the boat on the time where it could have had the biggest impact on me, but I had a good time regardless. I did end up getting a better hang of the controls as I got further in, and managed to reach a point where I felt like I could do at least some half decent lines that I was pretty satisfied with, but I still never got anywhere near close to really mastering the game. I guess you're expected to play through it over and over to really reach that point. A lot of the goals seemed rather inconsistent though. Some were really easy, presumably more about simply showing you where a line exists rather than demanding you nail it perfectly. But there were a few that were pretty hard and took quite a lot of tries. Doing those could be a bit frustrating, but also very satisfying to pull off. It might have something to do with me playing on Beginner mode. Maybe goals were designed around a higher difficulty and didn't all translate well to being made easier while still keeping them interesting.

The story is pretty fun too. I mean, it's far from a narrative masterpiece or anything, but it had a good sense of progression to it, in taking you through a whole pro skating career from humble beginnings in a way that feels authentic. Having Eric as a rival and a foil works well as part of that too. He's a style of character you don't really see much these days, someone who you love to hate. I think that's like a secret ingredient in making compelling stories in genres that don't tend to lend themselves to it, like this one. It gives you someone who you are motivated to take down and surpass just to prove you're better than them. Doesn't need to be high stakes, just make them entertaining to watch and motivate you to wipe the smirk off their face. That's what worked so well in Need for Speed: Most Wanted too.

This game had me wondering about my thoughts on control schemes in general too. Playing it I noticed that I might prefer games that were designed for a D-pad on an analogue stick, even when that seems counterintuitive. Although I did get more used to using the D-pad over time in this game, at first it was kind of a struggle. But I don't remember ever having an issue playing Project 8 through analogue on the 360. But as well as that, when I played Silent Hill a while back I ended up gravitating towards the stick despite the tank controls, and recently playing Link to the Past I did the same thing. I've even played several 2D platformers where the stick just felt like the more natural way to play to me. But at the same time it might have less to do with buttons vs. sticks, and more to do with where these inputs are placed on the controller. Having to angle my thumb down to the D-pad on the Xbox and Switch controllers for primary movement is pretty painful. It also felt uncomfortable trying to do the same for the the Playstation sticks for this game. But I've never had that issue using a PS controller sticks for any game that uses them as the default controls. So who knows...
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Alex79
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Alex79 »

Alex79 wrote: January 2nd, 2024, 12:11 pmJAN - Strider (Arcade on Evercade)
JAN - Strider (Megadrive on Switch)
JAN - God Of War (PS5)
JAN - Universal Paperclips (Android)

My children recently discovered clicker games, so I showed them Universal Paperclips and they've been playing that, so of course, I had another playthrough of it. Maddeningly addictive, I'm glad I can delete it from my phone for another few years!
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Indiana747
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Indiana747 »

(Jan) Battlefield 3 - Series X.
(Jan) Hi-Fi Rush - Series X.
(Jan) Daymare 1998 - Series X.
(Jan) The Beast Inside - Series X.
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Scrustle
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Scrustle »

Spoiler: show
12/01 - The Legend of Zelda: The Missing Link
28/01 - Tony Hawk's Underground
02/02 - Max Payne

This was a pretty good time. It has a strong atmosphere and identity to it, where a lot of what would go on to be Remedy’s signature style is already here despite the limitations of its age. It’s got some really good story presentation and the gameplay is entertaining, although a bit rough in this PS2 incarnation.

Visually it does come off as being incredibly basic. Everything is very boxy and flat, with very low poly models for everything and awkward character proportions. But the game is able to use that in its favour to create something that works really well. It has a very dingy, run-down feel to its world. It’s very bleak and stark, in a gritty and grimy way. It fits well with this dark tone of the criminal underworld perpetually set in the pitch black of night. It nails the vibe despite not having a lot to work with. Later on it does unfortunately move away from that as it ditches the urban setting for secret labs and offices. In a way those also fit the limited graphical style as they too are very monolithic and utilitarian, but it’s definitely a downgrade from the earlier parts of the game.

It’s very emblematic of a certain kind of game from this very specific period. The short time in the early PS2 era where console games actually arguably looked better than PC games, as the latter seemed to be still in the mindset of using graphical budget in the ways they had already been doing before that point. Opposed to console games that had a smoother look with higher poly character models and such.

But despite the dark tone and gloomy visuals, the game is also rather silly when it comes to certain parts of its story. Max’s narration it very well delivered and sells the hard-boiled renegade cop thing in an entertaining way, but it’s also very tropey to the point of being somewhat comedic. They lay it on thick. Ironically it feels like something Alan Wake would write.

There’s quite a lot of great little touches that give this game its own distinct personality, and shows that Remedy’s characteristic use of cross-media integration was something they were already experimenting with all the way back here. One little touch you’ll see early on are the TVs littered around levels, some showing news coverage of the events of the game, but others showing pulpy in-universe shows, including one that is clearly a Twin Peaks parody. The comic panels that tell the story between levels are also a part of this, with how they mix in-game graphics with photos of real people playing the characters. Although I have to admit, while they are interesting stylistic touch, I find them somewhat ugly. The filter they use over them to make the different assets blend together is rather rough. It’s clear the actors are having a lot of fun playing these characters though, so they definitely have a charm to them.

The more surreal hallucination sequences are a cool part of this whole thing too. The way they play around with the presentation in fun ways, and how the one that comes about 2/3 through the game does a lot of fourth wall breaking. That phone call moment where it makes fun of this style of noir crime writing with the overwrought metaphors to the point of nonsensical gibberish. A fun moment of self-aware humour. Not to mention the bit where Max lampshades being in a video game. I could have done without the platforming section though.

As for the actual main combat mechanics though, I have rather mixed feelings on. It doesn’t play great on PS2, but at the same time I didn’t exactly hate it. It had its moments, and even its flaws were interesting to dissect. By default the controls are pretty bad. Aiming is very jerky and rigid. It’s basically impossible to be quick or precise, no matter how you fiddle with the sensitivity. But that is expected of a console shooter from this era, before there was a fully agreed upon standard for how these worked. And it’s especially true for shooters that were ported from PC as this was. But an upside of being from this era means there are also a lot of different options for you to mess around with so you can try to find something that works for yourself. There is an option to accelerate your turning speed, but you do it by pressing in the right stick while turning, so it’s not very comfortable or useful. There is also a lock-on function, which is very basic and unpredictable, but it does at least work, so that’s what I ended up using.

The way the lock-on works is pretty strange, and it took me a bit of experimentation to figure out its quirks, which I found kind of interesting in itself. It’s not like the usual kind of lock-on you would expect to find in pretty much any other game. When you hold the button, it drags you aim over towards an enemy at the normal turn speed, rather than just snapping to them. If you let go before it reaches them, it’ll just return to normal behaviour. But if you actually point at an enemy, your aim will stay on them without having to use the lock-on button. You can un-lock from them, but you have to yank pretty hard on the stick to do it. If you manage to get your aim on to an enemy without using the lock-on button, it will also stick to them as if you had. It’s not quite clear how it decides what enemy to target though, seemingly going for whoever is closest regardless of whether you actually have a clear line of sight to them. It can be kind of a pain when you want to shoot someone in front of you but Max would rather point up at the ceiling or something. But this also has the side effect of letting you know when enemies are lying in wait behind a wall to ambush you, which can be pretty helpful. You die so quickly in this game with enemies that are hyper-aware and have hit-scan weapons that giving you a heads-up is actually welcome.

It’s interesting to think about how these aiming mechanics work though, as you can see developers trying different methods to solve the same problems before a time when they had become widely standardised. It also shows how there is an art to creating aiming systems like this, and there are ways to pick apart what makes for a good or bad implementation.

All the diving and slo-mo are a cool part of the gameplay as well, and add a lot to the experience that would be pretty bland and basic otherwise. Although it can be a bit annoying with the game only having eight way movement, it’s easy to end up leaping in a direction you didn’t intend because you were angling the stick just a few degrees the wrong way. But these moves lend a sense of excitement and dramatic style to fights that gives them an evasive feel which keeps the gameplay engaging despite the lock-on doing most of the aiming for you.

As I was looking up this game while playing, I also found there’s a pretty interesting story about how it got published. At first I was surprised to find that this game launched before GTA3, despite being published by Rockstar. One tends to think of Rockstar’s big publishing push in the 2000s being made possible off the success of GTA3. But I discovered that’s not quite accurate. The PC version of this game launched before GTA3, but that was put out by Gathering of Developers not long after they got bought out by Take-Two. Only the console version was published by Rockstar, which arrived after GTA3. Said port was developed by Rockstar Toronto, so presumably they are the ones who are responsible for this control scheme adaptation.

Despite pre-dating that Rockstar publishing push, this game does still fit in very well to that house style that they developed in that period. It’s right at home within the Rockstar canon, despite also of course still feeling distinctly Remedy-esque. Almost like this game could have taken place within some alternate reality version of the GTA world. Strange to think that this game which feels at home in this context wasn’t something that Rockstar themselves sought out to be involved with, but presumably just had it dropped on them by chance.

---

03/02 - The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD (Hero Mode)

The first thing that struck me on coming back to this game is how nice looking it is. I’ve always liked the visual design of this game, and it didn’t disappoint this time around either. It’s a great example of this era of graphics, with this remaster doing a really good job of highlighting what’s so good about it. It has a very rustic and tactile feel to it, thanks to textures that have an almost hand-drawn look to them, and shadows integrated in to them in a very artful way. It’s got a sort of pencil drawing look to it. It fits the grounded feel and earthy tones of the colours very well. It’s especially good when it comes to clothing materials on characters, where you can see the weave of the fabric. The bloom lighting is used well too when the sun gets low in the sky and bathes everything in a warm glow, or when it has that hazy, spooky look in the Twilight sections.

I was playing this run in Hero Mode. Usually I’m not very fond of when Zelda tries to push the difficulty up, but I decided to give it a go this time to shake things up a bit since the base game is pretty easy, also to provide a bit of novelty due to this version of the mode mirroring the entire game world like the Wii version did. That aspect did end up feeling somewhat uncanny, as some areas felt totally familiar, while others seemed slightly “off” in ways that were hard to pick out. It’s kind of ironic because I first played this game on the Wii, and initially had this strange feeling when I played it on GC later. Then by the time this remaster came out the default mode felt familiar and natural, and now this strange feeling has reversed its association for me. In terms of difficultly though, it’s still not particularly hard. It’s pretty manageable, but it does provide a hint of more challenge, and makes potions more important. It also gives Ooccoo an actual use, since it becomes very helpful to be able to warp out of a dungeon to restock. Almost no enemy actually poses much of a threat though, outside of dungeon sub-bosses and a couple of main bosses.

There was also a somewhat surprising amount of side-content. This game often gets criticised for being too linear, or the overworld being “empty”, so this time I went out of my way to see how true that really was. Turns out there’s already quite a lot of optional stuff to do right from finishing the third dungeon. There’s even a reasonable amount of stuff out there after the second. There’s a lot of points of interest in Hyrule Field that aren’t just the major towns and such as well. If you actually try to explore there is a decent amount of room to go off the critical path and find stuff out there dotted around the world.

Midna is a great character too, easily the best companion in the series. How she starts off as this demanding and impish personality whose motivations you’re unsure of. You can tell she’s mostly just using you. But then she evolves in to being more earnest and caring after Zelda sacrifices herself for her. She starts feeling guilty for what Zelda did for her, and drops the facade of not caring about Link or the situation of Hyrule. She grows more concerned about how her actions affect others, starting off being blasé about the use of dark power, to becoming wary of it and giving warnings about its dangerous potential. She’s fun to watch early on, and her somewhat antagonistic relationship with Link is amusing, but seeing her evolve in to a kinder more empathetic person is a nice piece of character growth.

I really like the way sword combat in this game works too. The secret techniques you get add a lot to how you can deal with encounters in a way that makes them way more interesting. When it comes specifically to sword fighting, it might still be the best in the series. Breath of the Wild and Tears of the Kingdom don’t have as much going on as this game when it comes to just what sword moves you can do, but they add a lot more on top of that with other systems that as a whole I suppose they are better when it comes to overall combat. These techniques work especially well on the larger enemies and sub-bosses, with a lot of them feeling designed around them without them being necessary for the most part. The extra damage of Hero Mode also helped make using these moves more valuable as well.

This game has some cool dungeon items too, but it’s a shame that some of them don’t go used much outside of the dungeons you obtain them in. The Spinner and Ball and Chain are some really fun items, but you barely use them outside of their introductions. That’s less true for the Spinner however, that one does get a bit of use in a couple of later dungeons and overworld spots. It still feels underused compared to other stuff though, which is a shame since it’s one of my favourite items in the series.

With that though I think I’m all Zelda’d out for the foreseeable future. I’ve had my fill from these last three months or so. I do still have a desire to try out the Link’s Awakening remake though. I’ve been listening to the soundtrack from that game a lot lately, it’s really on another level. And I suppose after finally playing Link to the Past that means I should get around to Link Between Worlds at some point too. But that’s enough for now.
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Alex79
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Alex79 »

Alex79 wrote: January 2nd, 2024, 12:11 pmJAN - Strider (Arcade on Evercade)
JAN - Strider (Megadrive on Switch)
JAN - God Of War (PS5)
JAN - Universal Paperclips (Android)
FEB - Alwa's Awakening (Evercade)

I really enjoyed this. A nice 8-bit style Metroidvania with some fun bosses and an interesting world. This is pretty much the perfect kind of game I want to play on Evercade. Took me just under five hours to finish and there are a couple of optional areas to go back and explore properly if I want.
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seansthomas
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by seansthomas »

Jan 4th - Shadow of the Tomb Raider (PS5)
Jan 10th - Jusant (Xbox Series S)

Feb 6th - Resident Evil 4 (PS5)

Bar a replay of the Resident Evil remake on Gamecube, I haven't played a Resident Evil game since the original version of 4 first came out, so I am way out of the loop in this series. And I wasn't going to play this, until every end of year show last month raved about it. So for £23, I thought, why not...

And I'm so glad I did. This would easily have topped my personal 2023 list.

It's probably because if RE4 (2005) was released now, it would hold up. That game is alchemy. And so too is this.

They've done a really good job of updating it and keeping it faithful, but not being restricted by that task. I honestly didn't see why anyone would need this game, but I stand corrected.

It still makes no sense plot wise, mixes camp with horror, has shooting ranges mid stealth sequence, throws in escort missions and has a mini game which involves rearranging your inventory.

On paper, it's insanity. The work of a madman who'd never get it over the line in 2023.

In reality, it's wonderful. The pacing is incredible. Every single sequence throws in a new weapon, idea, scenario, enemy, gameplay mechanic or twist. I can't think of any other game that feels such a rollercoaster vibe.

The little additions are smart, like the story beats that subvert expectations or the slightly freer movement and combat. It doesn't change the game, just modernises it a tad.

The only minor (and I mean minor) criticism I have is that the bosses aren't amazing. The lake sequence, the quarry fight and the final run of encounters don't hold up compared to the moment to moment gameplay. And I didn't find the village sequence at the start as awesome as I'd hoped; it felt cramped and restricted compared to my memories of it, and latter game areas.

But I am really nit picking here. Overall, RE4 is a triumph and I spent 20+ hours smiling from ear to ear, playing it.

Might start another run tonight...
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Truk_Kurt
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Truk_Kurt »

I loved it too, it was GOTY last year. The pacing was perhaps the best I've ever encountered in a game. I must admit I traded it in after I had finished it but I kind of regret that now. I may rebuy it or at least play it when it comes to game pass and buy the Eva DLC pack.
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seansthomas
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by seansthomas »

It's dropped in price incredibly quickly. I imagine it'll be sold digitally for under £20 within a few months if you ever wanna go back!
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Scrustle
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Scrustle »

Spoiler: show
12/01 - The Legend of Zelda: The Missing Link
28/01 - Tony Hawk's Underground
02/02 - Max Payne
03/02 - The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD (Hero Mode)
07/02 - Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne

Most of what is good about the first game is also good about this one. It retains that pulpy, gritty noir tone with Max’s excellently written and performed narration monologuing the whole experience. It’s got that dark mood but still with the levity of self-aware fourth wall breaking that elevates these games from simply just being a simple repetition of well worn tropes.

But the biggest thing that stands out as different from the original is how much they improved the controls in this sequel. At least with once again playing the PS2 version. Aiming feels way more precise and natural. The improvements allow it to have a much more manual interaction than the last game too. There’s no lock-on button this time, and instead it works more like the Halo style where the reticule will stick to enemies slightly if you pass over them. You actually have to be pretty close to get it to register though, so it’s a lot more subtle than the first game. The result is gameplay that is way more involving and rewarding.

There are also no pre-set controller layouts this time, and instead you can manually map every single command individually, which is a great help. The quick turn toggle returns, and while it’s still on R3 by default, changing it to something more comfortable is easily doable and makes the feature much more practical and useful. It is a little fiddly compared to a well-tuned aiming acceleration curve, but it does the job well enough and actually does allow you to have the choice of being able to turn quickly as well as aim more deliberately too.

More of the cutscenes are played in-engine now, probably thanks to the improved character models. They definitely help in making the story feel more connected to the events of gameplay, and also provide some moments to have some decent cinematography as well. But there’s still plenty of the comic panel style story segments, and they’re a step up too. They managed to rework how the filters look to pull off the illusion of being an illustration much better. They also just have better composition as well.

Graphics in general are much better. Apart from the character models, there’s also the environments. They are much more detailed now and feel like a more authentic and natural world. That does mean that they do lose some of their sense of bleakness that the first game had, but what replaces that is something that is equally appropriate with its grimy, dirty look. It fits the tone just as well.

I appreciated the sound design of this game too. Gun sounds in particular were really nice, having a very meaty and mechanical sound to them. Especially as you activate slo-mo and you can start hearing all the components of guns having a satisfying clank to them. Ambient sounds of the environments were well done too, like when it’s raining outside and you can hear it hammering down on the roof of the building you’re in. Very moody.

Speaking of bullet time, that has a few new fun quirks as well. Time slows even further the longer you have the effect active, that really emphasises the drama of the moment and also provides a helpful buff to the ability. You also do some stylish spin moves whenever you reload in bullet time, which is much quicker than doing it the normal way, allowing you to keep up the offensive and look even cooler doing it.

This game also does a lot of fun things with fourth wall breaking and messing with tropes an a humorous, self-aware way too. One of the best bits is nearer the start of the game where you enter the film set of an in-universe TV show that appears to be a parody of the events of the first game. Everything is made out of cardboard cut-outs, as if to symbolise how these tropes the game is playing with are full of paper thin stereotypical characters. I also think it might be making fun of the graphics of the first game a bit too, with how flat and basic they looked. But it does it all in a fun, good natured way that you can tell is full of appreciation for these tropes. It’s also an excuse to bring back some of the surreality of the level design and play some jokes on the player as well.

It was cool that you get to play as Mona Sax for a handful of levels, although I wasn’t a fan of the execution in some of them. It’s interesting to be able to see certain events from both Max’s and her perspective, but what you actually have to do as Mona is not particularly fun. While she has some levels where she just plays like Max, and that’s fine, for a big stretch in the middle of the game you instead have to provide sniper cover for Max as he’s pinned down by enemies. While the normal shooting controls feel good most of the time, they are pretty bad with the sniper. It has no aim assist at all, and it’s really awkward trying to get a bead on enemies so far away.

Overall it was a good time though. A really good follow-up to the first game that improved a lot in areas where that one was lacking. It does perhaps lose a little of the goofy charm the original had simply through just doing what it is more competently and professionally. But it still has a lot of personality and fun, silly moments with a metatextual element that make it feel distinctly like a Remedy game.
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oni-link
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by oni-link »

Dragon Quest II: Luminaries of the Legendary Line

I played the first DQ last year, and so decided to try the follow up after that. I played both from the fan translated SFC version on a retro handheld (RG35XX) over the space of a few months

I wanted to play the first DQ as it's an important game historically and introduced a lot of conventions to the JRPG genre. The second game often gets overshadowed by the first game, and isn't as popular as III and IV (both of which were also hugely influential) but to my surprise I think II is better than I in pretty much every regard.

The first game is still a lot of fun to play, and there is charm to it's simplicity. All battles are one on one. You have no party. The world is an open as it can be for 1986 and the quest is short and sweet.

The second game expands on this massively. You now have a party of 3. You get a boat that allows you to travel the entire world early on in the game. It's even more open. The entire map of the first game is only a small part of the second game. There are lots of cool little ways the world has changed (The second game is set 100 years after the first, and all your party members descend from the hero of the first game, hence the subtitle).

The game is just as obtuse as the first, which is more of an issue here due to the games expanded size and scope, however it's easy to be critical of this from a 2024 perspective. I'm sure back in the late 80s or early 90s this would have been one of the best games to own. An endless world for you to explore, notebook by your side, writing down all the clues and rumours people mention about places halfway across the world. In an era where most games could be beaten in at most a few hours, this endless epic odyssey across the seas to find the 5 crests would be the kind of game you could play for weeks or months.

The most pressing issue with the game is the back half (mostly the last area) wasn't really play tested, and so it's a huge difficulty spike. You step into the final area, a frozen hellscape containing nothing but wilderness and the final castle, only to be obliterated by standard mobs. Probably less of an issue for the 80s/90s player, who has completed an extra thousand battles exploring the world, but for the modern gamer who will check a guide for where to go next after 30mins of being lost, it can be a brutal beatdown. Luckily for me, I was able to switch the game to double speed to make grinding less of a pain. 30 mins later I was ready for the final assault.

Overall I think II introduces just as much to the genre as the first Dragon Quest does. It's often considered one of the hardest games in the series (which I believe was addressed to some extent in the various remakes) and while not as important as perhaps III, IV or V ended up being, it's still worthy of playing and a good time for anyone interesting in these ancient RPGs.
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Michiel K »

7 February: Tekken 8 (PS5)

I didn't complete the whole game, but I went through the main story mode in one go, taking about 4 hours to clear it.

I have to say, I didn't expect to be as impressed by it as I am! It's a lot of crazy melodrama for sure, built on the foundation of all the lore insanity that this series of fighting games is known for, but it fully commits and sincerely legitimises a lot of the nonsense and twists and turns in development of the select few characters in the series' cast that actually contribute to the plots... especially when it comes to Jin "Hey, I'm the protagonist again" Kazama.
Apart from that, it's also really well constructed, told and executed, generally avoiding the typical guff in fighting game story modes where characters constantly bump into each other and throw down for the silliest of reasons. And it does some really clever stuff where it uses the fights and the game's mechanics to highlight character development. Unexpectedly smart stuff.

There is a lot more to it than that and there are more than a few surprises, but I definitely recommend it, especially for people that have a bit of history with the series.
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ratsoalbion
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by ratsoalbion »

The upcoming Tekken series podcast should be a lot of fun.
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Michiel K
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Michiel K »

ratsoalbion wrote: February 9th, 2024, 1:52 pm The upcoming Tekken series podcast should be a lot of fun.
Yes, looking forward to it!
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Indiana747
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Indiana747 »

(Jan) Battlefield 3 - Series X.
(Jan) Hi-Fi Rush - Series X.
(Jan) Daymare 1998 - Series X.
(Jan) The Beast Inside - Series X.
(Feb) XIII - Series X.
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Truk_Kurt
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Re: Games Completed 2024

Post by Truk_Kurt »

Suicide Squad: Kill the Justice League
Overall I had a good time with it. If you like really fast and frenetic third person combat you will get a kick out of it. The combat reminds me of Doom 2016 as you are encouraged to be on the move and aggressive, then there is the aspect of picking up different types of ammo/health/shield depending on how you kill the enemy. It’s got a great script and I enjoyed the story, particularly the second half. For me it was let down by the repetitive mission design but the fun of the gameplay was enough for me to get past that. I was also slightly let down by the lack of creativity with collecting the riddler trophies compared to the arkham games but that’s a minor nitpick as I know most people didn’t go for all of them in the arkham games anyway. The world was also a disappointment, it didn't feel as rich as those Arkham games and felt rather empty. I am looking forward to going back for season one because the gameplay really was that fun for me.
I’d give it a 7/10
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